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Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

Author: Dave Stachowiak

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Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 15 million downloads and the #1 search result for coaching on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com
524 Episodes
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Marissa King: Social Chemistry Marissa King is professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management, where she developed and teaches a popular course entitled Managing Strategic Networks. Over the past fifteen years, she has studied how people's social networks evolve, what they look like, and why that's significant. Her most recent line of research analyzes the individual and group-level behaviors that are necessary for large-scale organizational change. She is the author of Social Chemistry: Decoding the Patterns of Human Connection*. In this conversation, Marissa and I explore the three major categories of personal networks — along with the strengths and challenges of each one. We make the invitation to strengthen your existing network instead of trying to further expand it. Plus, Marissa highlights several practical tips to more fully leverage the power of your own network. Key Points There are three types of networks: Expansionists have extraordinarily large networks and tend to be well known. They tend to be inspiring in both social and professional settings. Brokers generate value by bringing together from different social spaces. Their networks have large information benefits and are innovative. They are adaptive and have better work-life balance. Conveners build dense networks where all theirs friends are also friends. They enjoy deep trust and reputation benefits. Conveners tend to be great listeners. Maintaining great relationships with your existing network is often more productive than attempting to grow entirely new relationships. Those with very close relationships have been able to weather the storm of the pandemic with little impact on loneliness. We tend to underestimate both the strength of our networks and the willingness of others to help us. A starting point to improve the strength of your exiting network is either to be generous to someone by helping them in some way or to ask for support with something that might be helpful to us. Resources Mentioned Social Chemistry: Decoding the Patterns of Human Connection* by Marissa King Assess Your Network Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Linda asks advice on how to respond to burnout in her organization. Taylor wonders about the best time to create team expectations. Robert asks how to move forward when his manager doesn’t provide any meaningful feedback. Related Episodes The Way to Lead After a Workplace Loss, with Andrew Stenhouse (episode 142) How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349) How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross (episode 516) How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Greg McKeown: Effortless Greg McKeown is a speaker, bestselling author, and the host of the popular podcast What’s Essential. He has been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, Politico, and Inc. and has been interviewed on NPR, NBC, Fox, and many others. He is among the most popular bloggers for LinkedIn and also a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. His New York Times bestselling book Essentialism* has sold more than a million copies worldwide. He's the author of the new book, Effortless: Make It Easier to Do What Matters Most*. In this conversation, Greg and I explore how to simplify by asking key questions of ourselves and others. We discuss the tendency many of us have to work hard, but not necessarily clearly define what we’re trying to achieve. Plus, Greg invites us to look at the minimum steps required to complete what’s most essential. Key Points Take one minute to stop and define what done looks like. Crafting a “done for the day” list can provide clarity and boundaries to help us zero in on what’s most important. Ask yourself: what are the minimum steps required for completion? There’s a key distinction between a minimum number of steps and “phoning it in.” Decide in advance on what kind of work requires A+ effort, and where B effort is sufficient — and perhaps even better. Resources Mentioned Effortless: Make It Easier to Do What Matters Most* by Greg McKeown Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less* by Greg McKeown What’s Essential podcast by Greg McKeown Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) See What Really Matters, with Greg McKeown (episode 469) How to Change Your Behavior, with BJ Fogg (episode 507) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Michael Hyatt: Win at Work and Succeed at Life Michael is the founder and chairman of Michael Hyatt & Company, which helps leaders get the focus they need to win at work and succeed at life. Formerly chairman and CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, Michael is also the creator of the Full Focus Planner*. Michael is the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling author of several books, including Free to Focus*, Your Best Year Ever*, Living Forward*, and Platform*. His work has been featured by the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Inc., Fast Company, Businessweek, Entrepreneur, and other publications. He is the author with his daughter Meghan Hyatt Miller of Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork*. In this conversation, Michael and I discuss the challenge that many leaders face in finding balance. While many of us are motivated by achievement, Michael invites us to consider the value of nonachievment. We explore where to start and the benefits of being a beginner again through hobbies and other activities, unrelated to our careers. Key Points There’s incredible power in nonachievement. Many high-achieving people tend to have two leisure modes: feeling weird, unsettled, and distracted when taking time off — or vegging out on screens after exhaustion. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi advises doing something that’s not related to work at all to get you into a different mindset. Beware the belief that your hobby is your work. Spending more time on a hobby that has nothing to do with work can boost confidence in your ability to perform your job well. The challenge for high achievers in starting a hobby is that they must be a beginner again. Getting coaching to help get through these early stages can help. Resources Mentioned Bonus Resources: Win at Work and Succeed at Life Win at Work and Succeed at Life: 5 Principles to Free Yourself from the Cult of Overwork* by Michael Hyatt and Megan Hyatt Miller Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Transcend Work-Life Balance, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 315) How to Reclaim Conversation, with Cal Newport (episode 400) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Raja Rajamannar: Quantum Marketing Raja Rajamannar is Chief Marketing & Communications Officer for Mastercard, and president of the company’s healthcare business. He also serves as president of the World Federation of Advertisers. Raja has held C-level roles at firms ranging from Anthem to Humana, and has overseen the successful evolution of Mastercard’s identity for the digital age, from its Priceless experiential platforms to marketing-led business models. Raja’s work has been featured in Harvard Business School and Yale School of management case studies, and been taught at more than 40 top management schools around the world. He is the author of Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers*. In this conversation, Raja and I discuss the reality that traditional advertising as we know it is ending. He also invites us to rethink how we’ve traditionally thought about customer loyalty. Instead of telling stories about our brands, we should be doing the work to create stories along with our customers. Key Points Organizations need to engage in permission-based marketing to be credible to consumers. It’s helpful to think about relationships with consumers as affinity instead of loyalty. Most of what we call advertising today is interruptive to consumers and a poor experience. It’s not entirely dead, but certainly heading that way. Invite consumers into unique experiences by making the transition from storytelling to story making. Create experiences that are scalable and economically viable and sustainable. Smaller firms can seek out opportunities to create partnership that will help them make stories that are purposeful. Resources Mentioned Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers* by Raja Rajamannar Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead Top-Line Growth, with Tim Sanders (episode 299) Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381) Where to Start on Subscriptions, with Robbie Kellman Baxter (episode 484) If You Build It, They Will Come (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Shannon Minifie: Box of Crayons Shannon is the CEO of Box of Crayons, the firm behind the best-selling books The Coaching Habit* and The Advice Trap*. Box of Crayons is a learning and development company that helps unleash the power of curiosity to create connected and engaged company cultures. Shannon followed an unusual path to becoming CEO of Box of Crayons. Her career began in academia, a pursuit driven by her desire to be a part of conversations she thinks are important. In 2016, she embarked on a new path, starting a career in corporate learning and development. She brings to her role more than a decade of experience in education and in practicing incisive investigation. In this conversation, Shannon and I talk about the word curiosity and the reality that not everybody thinks about that word the same way we do. We explore the distinction between troublemakers and changemakers and provide practical suggestions to inspire more curiosity inside your organization. Plus, we highlight many of the common barriers to utilizing curiosity well. Key Points Curiosity is a state, not a trait. Nobody says they are against curiosity. But the truth is that they’re suspicious of it. Four things tend to hold firms back from the benefits of changemaker curiosity: Complacency: being used to the status quo. Delusion: the belief that they are already good at it. Environment: espoused values vs. what’s being done in practice because of real barriers. The Advice Monster: too much a cultural reliance on advice-giving. Resources Mentioned Box of Crayons The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458) How to Build a Coaching Culture, with Andrea Wanerstrand (episode 501) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
David Sparks: MacSparky David Sparks speaks and writes about how to use technology to be more productive. David is a past speaker at Macworld / iWorld and a regular faculty member for the American Bar Association’s TechShow. David has published numerous books and videos on how to use technology including the MacSparky Field Guide series that includes videos and books on managing email, going paperless, and how to make a winning presentation. David is also co-host of the popular Mac Power Users, Automators, and Focused podcasts. When not speaking and writing about technology, he’s a business attorney in Orange County, California. David recently released his Paperless Field Guide*. In this conversation, David and I review the key steps to managing a paperless lifestyle including how to capture, process, edit, and share documents. We share useful hacks to find data in documents, track changes, annotate PDFs, and much more. Key Points The goal of the paperless lifestyle is to provide sanity so you’re not spending time and energy managing paperwork. Scanner Pro is David’s recommended app for most people who want to capture documents easily with optical character recognition (OCR). Getting your documents into PDF format will allow them to be accessible for the future and also protect you from trouble with future software versions. Decide on a personal syntax for how you name files. Including a noun, verb, and date can be useful to surface documents later. Use “track changes” on Microsoft Word or “suggesting” on Google Docs for collaboration, review, and editing. If you use a tablet and do lots of reading or document review, consider utilizing some of the newest features for annotation and markup. Resources Mentioned Paperless Field Guide* by David Sparks LinkedIn Learning is a useful starting point for foundational skills on major software programs like Microsoft Word Mac Power Users podcast Related Episodes How To Get Control Of Your Email, with David Sparks (episode 119) The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this episode Tom and I discuss the common challenge of both making sense to others and making sense of what others say to you. Tom invites us to follow a four step approach of sorting and labeling so that it’s easier for listening to follow our thinking. Finally, we explore some of the common missteps in communicating with more clarity. Key Points The why behind making sense: it’s better for both the sender and the receiver. There are four key parts to the structure of making sense to others: Create a headline Sort into folders Label each folder Transition with precision Tom shared an example of two different ways to communicate a message about presentation skills, one without sorting and labeling, and one with it. Common mistakes in making sense include the espoused number of items not matching the number of actual items, explaining the folders first before setting the stage, and not transitioning well. Resources Mentioned Sorting & Labeling by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Subscribe to Tom's updates Related Episodes Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Pat Griffin: Dale Carnegie Pat has been actively engaged in helping organizations achieve greater success through the transformation of their people for almost two decades. He is a Dale Carnegie Master Trainer who helps organizations deliver measurable impact on strategic initiatives. Pat has extensive experience with manufacturing and engineering firms due to his previous career in those industries. He helps leaders zero in on process improvement and how the human side of that effort plays a significant role in its success or failure. Today he's Chief Relationship Officer at Dale Carnegie of Western New York. In this conversation, Pat and I discuss how managers can get alignment with employees about the key outcomes of their jobs. Pat invites us to create a Performance Results Description document, align with employees on the results, and then use it for tracking ongoing. Done well, this allows managers to influence better outcomes and provides more clarity for employees on where to place effort for results. Key Points Move past conversations about simply activities and towards conversations about outcomes. Documenting performance management helps create clarity for all parties on the results that are most critical. Managers and employees should work together to create a Performance Results Description (PRD) that captures the ideal results of the role. Within the PRD, Pat suggests that we identify 5-6 Key Result Areas (KRAs) and prioritize them. Example key result areas could be: quality control, new business development, cost analysis, customer evaluations, staffing, etc. Each Key Result Area (KRA) has at least one, and often more than one, performance standard. This is where specific metrics for outcomes can be tracked. An example is: “25% of sales revenue this year was generated from new customer accounts.” Use the performance Example section of a Performance Results Description (PRD): Key Result Area (KRA): Staffing Performance Standard #1: 25% of external applicants this year self-identify into an underrepresented group, as defined by our companies diversity and inclusion initiative. Performance Standard #2: Two thirds of open requisitions assigned this year are filled within 90 days of posting. Performance Standard #3: Recruiting events are scheduled with at least two universities this year where existing partnerships were not already in place. Resources Mentioned Dale Carnegie Friday workshop series Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Ethan Kross: Chatter Ethan Kross is one of the world’s leading experts on controlling the conscious mind. As an award-winning professor in the University of Michigan’s top-ranked Psychology Department and its Ross School of Business, he studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions, and relationships. His research has been published in Science, The New England Journal of Medicine, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He's been featured by Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and many other publications. He's the author of Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It*. In this conversation, Ethan and I highlight how introspection can sometimes do more harm than good. Ethan invites us to form a board of advisors that support us with both our emotional and cognitive needs. Plus, he shares the science behind how we can do this effectively for others. Key Points Simply sharing our emotions with others doesn’t help us to recover in any meaningful way. When seeking out advisors, we should find those who support both our emotional needs as well as our cognitive ones. You want a blend of both Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock. 🖖 Reflect on past conversations with advisors and determine if that previously helped you move forward with a challenging situation. That’s a key indicator to determine if they are people you want to keep engaging. Seek out different advisors for different things. A key distinction in supporting others is whether they have specifically sought out of advice or not. If not, being helpful people through invisible means is often useful. Resources Mentioned Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It* by Ethan Kross Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458) Leadership Lies We Tell Ourselves, with Emily Leathers (episode 479) Making the Most of Mentoring (free membership required) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Recent Trends Many leaders are seeking advice on how to manage up. We’re noticing that team behavior is a challenge for leaders right now. Listener Question Rudolf asked for recommendations on how to make the most of reading — and how to make time for it. Resources Mentioned Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes* by William Bridges with Susan Bridges Managing Transitions, 25th anniversary edition: Making the Most of Change* by William Bridges with Susan Bridges Readwise Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) How to be Diplomatic, with Susan Rice (episode 456) Giving Upward Feedback by Tom Henschel (The Look & Sound of Leadership) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tim Stringer: Technically Simple Tim Stringer is a coach, consultant, and trainer and the founder of Technically Simple. He provides productivity, technology and workflow coaching, consulting and training to people and organizations, large and small, all over the planet. His technology specializations include Asana, Daylite, OmniFocus, and Trello. He supports many people in productivity though his website LearnOmniFocus.com -- and also through the Holistic Productivity approach that he developed after coming face-to-face with cancer back in 2008. Tim consults to leaders and organizations on how to use Zoom effectively and recently launched a new course: Leading Effective Zoom Events. In this conversation, Tim and I overview some of the common mistakes of online events, how online can produce even better results than in-person, and ways to engage people quickly. Plus, we review some of the key technology that will support your organization’s outreach efforts. Key Points It’s often a mistake to assume that you’ll be able to lead online events with the same planning and design for in-person events. Opening a meeting early and using the five-minute rule to begin with icebreakers, breakouts, polls, or reactions will help engage people in the event quickly. For events with many people or higher visibility for your organization, have a dedicated technology co-pilot so that hosts and speakers can stay focused on being present. Virtual lounges (with a dedicated host), spotlight and multi-spotlight, practice sessions, and preassigned breakouts can all help the technology disappear and the human connections to take center stage. Some organizations are discovering they are more successful with online events than past in-person ones. Many have had such a positive experience that they plan to continue leveraging virtual events after the pandemic. Resources Mentioned Leading Effective Zoom Events by Tim Stringer Recommended Practices for Engaging Online Events (PDF download) Related Episodes Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381) How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395) How to Run an Online Meeting, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 472) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Lisa Feldman Barrett: Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain Lisa Feldman Barrett is among the top one percent most cited scientists in the world for her revolutionary research in psychology and neuroscience. She is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University, with appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also Chief Science Officer for the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Harvard University. In addition to her bestselling book How Emotions Are Made*, she has published over 240 peer-reviewed, scientific papers appearing in Science, Nature Neuroscience, and other top journals in psychology and cognitive neuroscience. She has also given a popular TED talk with nearly 6 million views and received a Guggenheim Fellowship in neuroscience and an NIH Director's Pioneer Award. In this conversation, Lisa and I discuss the lessons from her newest book, Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain*. We explore some of the common misperceptions about brain biology and examine how much energy use and conservation affects us. Then, we uncover how we can help ourselves — and others — learn better. Key Points The primary purpose of your brain is to keep you alive. As a result, your brain predicts almost everything you do. Unlike how we perceive, sensing actually comes second for the brain. It’s wired to prepare for action first. Learning is an expensive use of energy. Leaders can cultivate environments for learning by providing stable environments that don’t burn unnecessary energy. Changing behavior in the heat of the moment isn’t likely, but we can change how our brain will predict outside of the moment. You are always cultivating your past, since today’s present becomes the past. That’s how you change the way your brain predicts in the future. Resources Mentioned Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain* by Lisa Feldman Barrett Lisa Feldman Barrret’s website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) Four Steps to Get Training Results, with Jim Kirkpatrick (episode 446) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tendayi Viki: Pirates in the Navy Tendayi Viki is an author, innovation consultant, and Associate Partner at Strategyzer, helping large organizations innovate for the future while managing their core business. He has been shortlisted for the Thinkers50 Innovation Award and was named on the Thinkers50 Radar List for emerging management thinkers to watch. He's written three books based on his research and consulting experience, Pirates In The Navy*, The Corporate Startup* and The Lean Product Lifecycle*. The Corporate Startup * was awarded the CMI Management Book Of The Year In Innovation and Entrepreneurship. He is also a regular contributing writer for Forbes. In this conversation, Tendayi and I discuss how innovators often take on the role of pirates in the navy. We explore the mindset that innovators inside organizations need to avoid the common mistakes in advancing new ideas. Plus, we discuss why innovators should ignore detractors early on, parter with early adopters, and use early wins to move forward. Key Points Middle managers may stifle innovation, but often that’s because of internal pressure from those at the top to keep results coming. Innovators should beware basking in the glow of the CEO. It’s essential to engage other stakeholders in the business. Partnering with early adopters is essential for innovators. These are the managers who have existing frustrations with the status quo and are already trying new things. Celebrate early wins through blog posts, workshops, success stories, interviews, and even external conferences. These help you gain credibility. Beware basking too much in early wins. The point of early wins is to give you credibility to move on to the next stage. Resources Mentioned Pirates In The Navy: How Innovators Lead Transformation* by Tendayi Viki The Corporate Startup: How Established Companies Can Develop Successful Innovation Ecosystems* by Tendayi Viki, Dan Toma, and Esther Gone The Lean Product Lifecycle: A Playbook for Making Products People Want* by Tendayi Viki, Craig Strong, and Sonja Kresojevic In Defense Of Middle Managers Who Stifle Innovation by Tendayi Viki Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418) How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Dave Crenshaw: The Myth of Multitasking Dave Crenshaw develops productive leaders in Fortune 500 companies, universities, and organizations of every size. He has appeared in Time magazine, USA Today, FastCompany, and the BBC News. His courses on LinkedIn Learning have been viewed tens of millions of times. His five books have been published in eight languages, the most popular of which is The Myth of Multitasking: How “Doing It All” Gets Nothing Done*. In this conversation, Dave and I discuss why multitasking is a myth and how switchtasking stops us from being efficient. We highlight a few key indicators that will help you determine if you’re switchtasking more that you imagine. Finally, we detail three practical steps you can take to be more present for yourself and others. Key Points 40% of knowledge workers never get more than thirty minutes straight of focused time. True multi-tasking is a myth. Most people are switchtasking — and losing time when they do it. An indicator that you might not be present with others is if they linger when conversations are complete. Determining when you will give people your full attention will help both of you be more efficient during (and outside) those conversations. Tracking your weekly timeline will help you make better decisions about where to be most present. Your calendar is your best time management app. Resources Mentioned Time Management Fundamentals by Dave Crenshaw on LinkedIn Learning The Myth of Multitasking: How “Doing It All” Gets Nothing Done by Dave Crenshaw Related Episodes Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) See What Really Matters, with Greg McKeown (episode 469) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Therese Huston: Let’s Talk Therese Huston is a cognitive scientist and the founding director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Seattle University. She has written for The New York Times and the Harvard Business Review and has previously given talks at Microsoft, Amazon, TEDxStLouis, and Harvard Business School. Her prior books are titled Teaching What You Don't Know* and How Women Decide*. She's the author of the book Let's Talk: Make Effective Feedback Your Superpower*. In this conversation, Therese and I discuss how we can reduce bias that may unintentionally show up in our feedback. We examine several of the key feedback challenges for managers, including telling women they need to speak up, that they are too aggressive, or concerned they will “take it the wrong way.” We also highlight key language that can help leaders make these conversations more productive and transparent. Key Points Managers tend to sugarcoat feedback, but especially when feedback is being given to women. If someone is coming across aggressively, consider language like, “I’m not sure if that feedback is fair or unfair, but I wanted you to know it’s the impression some people have of you.” When giving feedback with the intention to help somebody improve, invoke high standards and assure the other person they can reach those standards. When feedback brings out strong emotion, help people restore their own control vs. trying to control. Research show that when giving feedback to someone whose face stands out, we spout vague pronouncements about how nice they are to be around. Resources Mentioned Let's Talk: Make Effective Feedback Your Superpower* by Therese Huston Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) How Women Make Stronger, Smarter Choices, with Therese Huston (episode 255) How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tammy Bjelland: Workplaceless Tammy Bjelland is the Founder and CEO of Workplaceless, a training company that teaches remote workers, leaders, and companies how to work, lead, grow, and thrive in distributed environments. Workplaceless is a fully distributed company supporting enterprise, remote, and government clients such as Toyota, GitLab, and the US Department of Commerce. In this conversation, Tammy and I discuss how leaders can establish a mindset that helps them lead remote teams more successfully. We discuss how to take on a placeless mindset, explore the importance of shifting from how to why, and the best starting points for a communication charter. Key Points Five key principles of a Placeless mindset: Embrace location independence over physical presence. Empower autonomous work with flexible schedules. Impact productivity with asynchronous communication and collaboration. Be open and transparent. Trust your colleague and employees. Fear of losing control tends to keep organizations from being able to make useful shifts in mindset. Leaders and organizations that move beyond the “how” of remote work and focus first on the “why” will have more sustainable success. Beware of simply trying to replicate what happened in the office. The whole point of remote work is that it is not like the office. Establish a communication charter. This makes it clear what tools are best — and also how to intervene when things don’t work as anticipated. Resources Mentioned Placeless Mindset by Workplaceless Goplaceless by Workplaceless Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Lead a Remote Team, with Susan Gerke (episode 465) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Stefanie Johnson: Inclusify Stefanie Johnson is an author, professor, and keynote speaker who studies the intersection of leadership and diversity, focusing on how unconscious bias affects the evaluation of leaders and strategies that leaders can use to mitigate bias. Stefanie is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, teaching courses on leadership and inclusion. She is also a member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches program and was selected for the 2020 Thinkers50 Radar List. She is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and many other publications. In this conversation, Stefanie and I discuss her book Inclusify: The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging to Build Innovative Teams*. We look at how optimism may get in the way of building an inclusive workforce. Plus, Stefanie invites leaders to make public commitments and begin using metrics to track performance. Key Points Our two most basic human desires are to be unique and to belong. Leaders often end up with either cohesive teams of people who all act similarly or a lot of diverse individuals who don’t gel. Optimists intend well, but don’t initiate real change unless something triggers them to do so. Optimists should be more public with their commitment to be champions for uniqueness and belonging. Organizations and leaders should set metrics for diversity, just as they do for almost everything else. Resources Mentioned Inclusify: The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging to Build Innovative Teams* by Stefanie Johnson Inclusify Card Games by Stefanie Johnson Book Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Make Inclusion Happen, with Deepa Purushothaman (episode 307) How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
BJ Fogg: Tiny Habits BJ Fogg is a behavior scientist, with deep experience in innovation and teaching. He's directed a research lab at Stanford University for over 20 years. He trains innovators to create solutions that influence behavior for good in the areas of health, sustainability, financial wellbeing, learning, productivity, and more. He is an expert in behavior change, from habit formation to company culture change. Fortune Magazine named him a "New Guru You Should Know" for his insights about mobile and social networks. His is the author of the New York Times bestseller Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything*. In this conversation, BJ and I discuss why new information alone doesn’t tend to lead to the behavior change most of us want. Instead, we explore BJ’s research and a key, 3-step process that will help all of us to create habits that stick. Plus, he points out that habits are even more about emotion than they are about repetition. Key Points Information does not lead to action. It’s a myth that it takes 21 or 66 days to create a habit. Repetition doesn't create habits. Emotions create habits. People change best by feeling good, not by feeling bad. The feeling of success is what wires in the habit. A garden is a useful analogy for habits. There is a season for every habit — and they often are not permanent. Create a tiny habit through an ABC process: anchor moment, a tiny behavior, and instant celebration. Avoid raising the bar on the tiny behavior. Do more if you want to, but don’t change the standard. Resources Mentioned Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything* by BJ Fogg BJ’s website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232) Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Minda Harts: The Memo Minda Harts is the founder and CEO of The Memo and an advocate for women of color in the workplace. She is a sought-after speaker and thought-leader, frequently speaking on topics of advancing women of color, leadership, diversity, and entrepreneurship. In 2018, Minda was named as one of 25 Emerging Innovators by American Express. Minda has been a featured speaker at TEDx Harlem, Nike, Levi's, Twitch, Bloomberg, Google, LinkedIn, SXSW, and many other places. She is an adjunct assistant professor of public service at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She also hosts Secure the Seat, a weekly career podcast for women of color. She's the author of the bestselling book The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table*. In this conversation, Minda and I discuss the motivation for her work and the reality that recent events have been for women of color in the workplace. Minda shares some of the common obstacles that, good intentions aside, keep white folks from supporting women of color in their careers. Plus, we highlight some of the key offenses white leaders tend to make and how all of us can do better. Key Points While many leaders notice and consider the events of the day, the news often hits in a personal way for women of color. When asked, women of color tend to report that it’s white men who are showing up as sponsors and mentors. A key trigger point for women of color is to be described as “articulate.” The word “women” tends to be used as a one-size-fits-all. Be mindful that women don’t all experience the workplace in the same way. One key action white leaders can take to be a better success partner is ensuring the voices of women of color show up on diversity panels and as speakers. Resources Mentioned The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table* by Minda Harts Minda’s website Book Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) Journey Towards Diversity and Inclusion, with Willie Jackson (episode 441) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Comments (27)

susccsass sksk

Nice

Apr 24th
Reply

Ben P. Ashton

great conversation. found this really helpful.

Apr 20th
Reply

RebeccaMelton at MaryKay

SOOOOOO GOOD!!

Aug 6th
Reply

Patrecia Sapulette

Thanks Dave and Peter !!! this answer a question troubled me for some time!

Apr 5th
Reply (1)

Patrecia Sapulette

so beautiful!!! Thanks!

Apr 2nd
Reply

Patrecia Sapulette

oh my! this is gold!!!

Feb 2nd
Reply (1)

Patrecia Sapulette

great!!!

Feb 1st
Reply

Sonam Sherpa

bullshit podcast, waste of time

Dec 12th
Reply (1)

Ed Troxell

“Learning is messy” 👌

Jul 29th
Reply (1)

Frank Boucher (FBoucheros)

Nice episode explaining how a group can help you to grow and become a better "you", and that blogging is still a great way to structure/ but together our thoughts.

Jul 22nd
Reply

Özgür Yüksel

This is an awesome episode. Loads of golden notes in here..

Jun 9th
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Jenae Adams

I loved this so much! I'm a millennial that's currently up for mentoring adoption. I own a business that specializes in finding and removing the blocks in a business that hold back their sales team from being successful and also removing the subconscious mental blocks that hold back the employees and team members from being confident and successful. The business name is Carefree Confidence, LLC and the website is www.carefree-confidence.com I would be so grateful to have a mentor that can help me move forward and I can help you grow leadership skills and the understanding of female millennials.

May 9th
Reply

Keiichi Minami

Excelleent podcast!

May 2nd
Reply

Tudor Popa

how come not all episodes available? looking for 139. thanks

Jan 15th
Reply (1)

David Lanchart

I love Lisa's perspective on looking outward instead of always looking inwards.

Dec 14th
Reply

Kronen Bing

very informative and told in an accessible and engaging way

Nov 29th
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Harriet Cameron

Brilliant podcast. Thank you for sharing your insight! Harriet, New Zealand

Oct 24th
Reply

Nory Protacio

hi Dave. do you have any episodes on delivering bad news?

Apr 27th
Reply (1)

Casey Thatcher

Why are some episodes missing?

Mar 2nd
Reply (1)

Jolanta Skupińska

Bb

Feb 18th
Reply
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