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Frederic Laloux: Reinventing Organizations Frederic is the author of Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness*. The book is a global word-of-mouth bestseller with over 850,000 copies sold in 20 languages. Frederic’s work has inspired the founders of Extinction Rebellion, the Sunrise Movement, and Project Drawdown, as well as countless corporate leaders and faith movements. In a past life, he was an associate principal with McKinsey & Company. He's also the creator of the Insights for the Journey video series. In this conversation, Frederic and I explore a place where almost every leader can have a meaningful impact: helping people show up as their whole selves. We discuss how critical it is for leaders to lead the way in doing this — and how storytelling can be an important entry point. We look at some of practical actions leaders can take to enter into a place of wholeness, including elevating beyond content, using everyday language, and integrating with the work at hand. Key Points As a leader, wholeness begins with you. Exploring wholeness yourself sets the stage for everyone else to be able to engage more fully. Rather than talking lots about wholeness, it’s often helpful just to begin modeling it. When you do, everyday language us useful to help others engage. Your personal history, the history of the organization, and the organization’s purpose are often helpful stories to share that open up a space for wholeness. You can turn any conversation into a moment of wholeness. One invitation for leaders is to stop talking about content and elevate the dialogue to “what’s happening” overall. Resist any temptation to disconnect wholeness from the work at hand. Bringing these together helps people to show up at work more authentically. Resources Mentioned Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness* by Frederic Laloux Reinventing Organizations: An Illustrated Invitation to Join the Conversation on Next-Stage Organizations* by Frederic Laloux Insights for the Journey video series by Frederic Laloux Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. As an internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this conversation, Tom and I explore the sometimes awkward moment of needing to get buy-in from your manager on a next step, proposal, or funding. We detail three considerations and how attention to them can help you frame this conversation better. Plus, we share tactics such as making the business case, telling a story, and past interactions — in order to help you get forward movement. Key Points Three lenses of consideration are helpful when considering how to pitch you manager: purpose, preference, and protocol. When framing your purpose in making a pitch, it’s helpful to be able to change altitude. Consider “clicking out” on a map to frame the bigger picture. To be purposeful, make sure you are making the business case for whatever you are pitching. Anger and emotion can be sentinels that you might not have moved past thinking about it personally or framed the business context fully. Consider past interactions with your manager on how they prefer to receive information. The way you pitch them should begin with their preferences, not yours. Get intel in advance from other stakeholders, if practical. They can help you see the variables that might be clouding your judgement if you’re too close to the situation. Clearly frame the problem and examples of it. Consider strutting your pitch in the framework of The Want, The Obstacle, and The Resolution (see PDF below). Resources Mentioned Storytelling: A Three-Part Model by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Allison asked for resources on how to lead others who are more knowledgeable than you in the field of work. Everett wondered how he can navigate a situation where accents make it difficult to understand interview candidates. Stephen asked about motivating people independent of incentives. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager: Positive Political Skills at Work* by Peter Block Drive* by Daniel Pink Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Humble Leadership* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein HBO Max Presents Brené Brown: Atlas of the Heart Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People* by Donna Hicks On the folly of rewarding A while hoping for B by Steven Kerr Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) How to Motivate People, with Dan Ariely (episode 282) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
David Novak: Take Charge of You David Novak is Co-Founder, retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world’s largest restaurant company with over 45,000 restaurants in more than 135 countries and territories. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in revenue to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. David is also the host of the top-ranked podcast, How Leaders Lead and founder of the leadership development platform of the same name. An expert on leadership and recognition culture, David is also a New York Times bestselling author. His books include Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen, O GREAT ONE! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, and his latest book with Jason Goldsmith, Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career*. In this conversation, David and I discuss the importance of finding joy in our careers. David highlights several of the key questions that he utilizes when helping others to uncover how joy can show up their work. He encourages us to surface the single biggest thing that’s important right now in order to get immediate traction. Key Points Sometimes your best (and only) coach is yourself. Use joy as your destination finder. Find your joy blockers by asking yourself: what’s getting in the way of my joy? Your worst days often provide insight on this. Discover your joy builders by asking yourself: what would grow your joy personal and professionally? Your most memorable days are starting points for answers here. Your goal is to surface your single biggest thing. This changes over time, but ideally is only one thing, one at a time. That’s how you gain traction. Resources Mentioned Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career* by David Novak and Jason Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo (episode 542) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Whitney Johnson: Smart Growth Whitney Johnson is CEO of the tech-enabled talent development company Disruption Advisors, an Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private company in America. As one of the top ten business thinkers in the world as named by Thinkers50, Whitney is an expert at smart growth leadership. She has worked at FORTUNE 100 companies, and as an award-winning equity analyst on Wall Street. Whitney co-founded the Disruptive Innovation Fund with the late Clayton Christensen. She has coached alongside Marshall Goldsmith, selected by him in 2017 as a Top 15 Coach out of a pool of more than 17,000 candidates. She is the author of Disrupt Yourself and the host of the podcast of the same name. She is also the author of Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company*. In this conversation, Whitney and I explore a big reality of growth; it’s often slow at the start. We discuss three practical steps that leaders can take for both themselves and others to stay engaged during the early stages of growth. Key Points Auditing some of your roles, secrets, beliefs, values, and boundaries will help you move forward along the growth path. Listen to the stories that others tell and help them link past experiences with what’s important today. Images are a critical entry point to growth. Utilize them in addition to the new behavior itself to begin to frame your thinking and identity. Circle back after receiving feedback and show others what you’ve learned from it and how it’s changed your behavior. That motivates them to stay invested. Use “I am” statements that have a noun rather than a verb. Instead of “I run,” consider saying, “I am a runner.” Resources Mentioned Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company* by Whitney Johnson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Richard Rierson: Dose of Leadership Richard Rierson has over 30 years of real-world, practical leadership experience as a United States Marine Corps officer, professional aviator, and corporate executive. His philosophy is that our leadership challenges should be met with the lifelong dedication and pursuit of becoming composed, confident, consistent, courageous, and compassionate. In addition to being a sought after speaker, coach, and consultant, he is the host of the highly acclaimed Dose of Leadership podcast. He's also a commercial airline pilot, currently flying as a first officer on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In this conversation, Richard and I explore how professional aviation emerged from the accidents of the 1970’s to improve challenging authority inside the cockpit. We discuss the principles of crew resource management (CRM) and how more structure and intention between crew members vastly reduced the number of aviation accidents. We examine what leaders can do to use similar principles to support appropriately challenging authority inside their organizations. Key Points Almost every accident is a chain of events. The key is to have self awareness in the chain and to interrupt it. Making the invitation to challenge before the work begins makes it far more likely that another party will speak up when they see something. Pilots use green, yellow, and red as simple and immediate indicator to others in the cockpit how much stress they are holding. Three steps are use to pilots to escalate challenging a more senior pilot: ask a question, make a suggestion, take control i.e. “my aircraft.” Resources Mentioned Sully with Tom Hanks The Crash of Flight 401, and the Lessons for Your Company by Dave Yarin The Evolution of Airline Crew Resource Management by Jean Dennis Marcellin Related Episodes The Way to Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Talk to People Who Have Power, with Jordan Harbinger (episode 343) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Deepa Purushothaman: The First, The Few, The Only Deepa is the co-founder of nFormation, a company which provides a brave, safe, and new space for professionals who are women of color. She spent more than twenty years at Deloitte and was a first herself: an Indian American woman and one of the youngest people to make partner in the company’s history. In her time there, she helped grow Deloitte's Social Impact Practice, served as a National Managing Partner of Inclusion, and served as the Managing Partner of WIN—the firm’s renowned program to recruit, retain, and advance women. Deepa speaks extensively on women and leadership. She has been featured at national conferences and in publications including Bloomberg BusinessWeek, The Huffington Post, and Harvard Business Review. She is the author of The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America*. Key Points The corporate space has not fostered true equity. Often, many of us don’t see the systemic examples each day of friction. “We can’t find you,” is an often believed delusion when companies intend to attract more women of color. “I don’t see color,” is often a well-intended belief, but in practice often marginalizes the lives experiences of women of color. “DEI will fix it all,” is an illusion. We all should be supporting peers in formal DEI roes to volunteer, show up, and be key partners in the work that benefits all of you. “You got white-manned,” reflects the belief that the world has to be a zero-sum competition. Resources Mentioned The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America* by Deepa Purushothaman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Nate Zinsser: The Confident Mind Nate Zinsser is an expert in the psychology of human performance. He has been at the forefront of applied sport psychology for over thirty years. He has been a regular consultant to the Philadelphia Flyers and New York Giants as well as a consultant for the FBI Academy, the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit. Since 1992 he has directed a cutting edge applied sport psychology program at the United States Military Academy’s Center for Enhanced Performance, personally conducting over seventeen thousand individual training sessions and seven hundred team training sessions for cadets seeking the mental edge for athletic, academic, and military performance. His most recent book is titled The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance*. In this conversation, Nate and I explore the reality that almost every leader faces: continual challenges to our own confidence. We examine some of the misconceptions around confidence and how those misperceptions tend to limit us. Then, we discuss the most effective practices you can use to maintain — and improve — the confidence that you’ve already built. Key Points It’s a misconception that once you become confident, you’ll stay that way forever. Confidence has little to do with what happens to you and tons to do with how you think about what happens to you. For a more constructive attitude when bad things happen, use these three elements: decide that it’s temporary, limited, and non-representative. To win the battle with your own negative thinking, acknowledge the negativity, silence it, and then replace it with something better to get the last word. Protecting your confidence is an ongoing practice. You’ll never stop doing it — but the good news is that it will give you an edge if you can develop this practice. Resources Mentioned The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance* by Nate Zinsser Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Keith Ferrazzi: Competing in the New World of Work Keith Ferrazzi is the founder and chairman of Ferrazzi Greenlight, a management consulting and coaching company that works to transform many of the largest organizations and governments in the world. A graduate of Harvard Business School, Keith rose to become the youngest chief marketing officer of a Fortune 500 company during his career at Deloitte and later became CMO and head of sales at Starwood Hotels. He has contributed to Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Fortune, and The Wall Street Journal and is The New York Times number one bestselling author of Who’s Got Your Back, Never Eat Alone, and Leading Without Authority. He is the co-author with Kian Gohar and Noel Weyrich of Competing in the New World of Work: How Radical Adaptability Separates the Best from the Rest*. In this conversation, Keith and I discuss what his team and him have learned from the most resilient teams they’ve supported. We explore some of the most useful strategies to build a more resilient team and highlight key actions that will help leaders and teams through challenging times. Key Points Resilient teams have compassion and empathy for each other. They show care through both success and failure. Humility is the ability to ask for help. Resilient teams have a culture that supports and encourages this. Many leaders espouse candor for their teams, but far less actually have teams with candor. Resilient teams speak truth — and it’s up to leaders to show them the way. Resourceful teams develop solutions at a higher velocity. They use systems and structures to move past challenges and doubts more quickly. Resources Mentioned Competing in the New World of Work* by Keith Ferrazzi, Kian Gohar, and Noel Weyrich 7 Strategies to Build a More Resilient Team* Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How Great Teams Find Purpose, with David Burkus (episode 481) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Cassandra Worthy: Change Enthusiasm Cassandra Worthy enables organizations and individuals to grow through major change and significant shift by harnessing the power of emotion. Whether undergoing a merger, acquisition, start-up, explosive growth, or significant contraction, the strategies and tools of Change Enthusiasm are motivating and energizing workforces worldwide. Her consulting firm was birthed from the pain and challenges she overcame as a corporate executive. Cassandra’s client base spans the Fortune 500, including Procter & Gamble, Allstate, Jones Lang LaSalle, Centene Corporation, ConferenceDirect, and WeWork. She's a chemical engineer by training and also brings over a decade of M&A experience distilled down into the critical leadership traits required to lead with exception during times of change and trans-formation. She's the author of Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success*. In this conversation Cassandra and I explore the critical importance of emotion in the change process. We detail some of the key places where leaders often miss opportunities to prioritize employee well-being. Then, Cassandra shares some practical steps leaders can take that will help employees better recognize signal emotions so they can eventually find opportunity and choice during the change process. Key Points Many leaders tend to diminish or ignore negative emotions during change. Actively doing that may prevent employees in getting to a place where they see opportunity — and eventually choice. Beware focusing too much attention on vision, roles, and responsibilities — and not enough on employee well-being and fulfillment. The change process is like driving in a car. The structure of the process is the vehicle itself and the people are their fuel. Have discussion about handling change a regular item in 1:1 agendas and team meetings. Leaders can enter into the opportunity that change provides by sharing their own emotions. One way to do this is to be explicit in conversation about what is genuinely inspiring you about the change. Resources Mentioned Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success* by Cassandra Worthy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Hassan Osman: Hybrid Work Management Hassan Osman is a director at Cisco Systems (his views are his own) where he leads a team of project and program managers on delivering complex projects across the world. He’s also served as a management consultant at EY, where he led projects and programs for the largest enterprises. Hassan the author of several Amazon bestselling books about team management, including his most recent book, Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace*. In this conversation, Hassan and I examine the new reality and popularity of the hybrid workforce. Many leaders are now managing teams that are both co-located and remote, with individual team members regularly migrating between the two. We explore useful practices that will help you support effective teamwork and progress, regardless of physical location. Key Points Recent statistics from many sources are indicating that a majority of employees desire (and are beginning to expect) some kind of hybrid work arrangement. Lead with a remote first culture so that there isn’t a two-tier class of employees in your organization. Conduct all meetings online, regardless of the location of attendees. Use technology to provide a seamless experience whether somebody is co-located or remote. Batch meetings together and, if possible, align work days to allow from in person interactions, when ideal. Be cognizant of offline decisions. Involve remote employees in conversation that start offline and inform them about updates and decisions that might have occurred outside virtual interactions. Resources Mentioned Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace* by Hassan Osman Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team (Udemy course) The Couch Manager (Hassan's site) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland (episode 509) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Hyflex Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed podcast) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Sarah Stein Greenberg: Creative Acts for Curious People Sarah Stein Greenberg is the Executive Director of the Stanford d.school. She leads a community of designers, faculty, and other innovative thinkers who help people unlock their creative abilities and apply them to the world. She speaks regularly at universities and global conferences on design, business, and education. Sarah holds an MBA from Stanford's Graduate School of Business and also serves as a trustee for global conservation organization Rare. She is the author of the book Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways*. In this conversation, Sarah and I discuss the reality that all of us face with real learning: uncomfortable struggle. We detail some of the typical pattens that occur with struggle and how we can almost predict it at certain points. Plus, we discussed what Sarah and her colleagues have discovered about we can do to make the most of the struggles we regularly face. Key Points Part of the process of creativity almost always feels terrible. The “trough of despair” is hard, but also essential. Struggle helps us learn better. There’s a sweet spot between what you already know well and what seems impossible. That middle zone is productive struggle. It’s helpful to set expectations in advance when innovating or creating that discomfort is an indicator that you’re moving forward. When people are in the midst of struggle, shifting the focus from thinking and talking to actually doing can often illuminate the best, next step. Productive struggle often comes at predictable moments. When it does, scaffolding and models can help move us along to get to where we need to go. Resources Mentioned Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways* by Sarah Stein Greenberg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes, with Jeff Hittenberger (episode 326) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Michael F. Schein: The Hype Handbook Michael F. Schein is the founder and president of MicroFame Media, a marketing agency that specializes in making ideabased companies famous in their industries. His writing has appeared in Fortune, Forbes, Inc., Psychology Today, and Huffington Post, and he is a speaker for international audiences spanning from the US to China. He is also the creator of the popular Hype Book Club, which provides regular recommendations of books about hype artists and hype strategies. Michael is the author of The Hype Handbook: 12 Indispensable Success Secrets From the World's Greatest Propagandists, Self-Promoters, Cult Leaders, Mischief Makers, and Boundary Breakers*. In this conversation, Michael and I explore his research on hype and how we can benefit from lessons throughout the history of human influence. We examine what we can learn from both positive and negative examples to discover how to brand ourselves better. Michael then invites us to frame the messaging about our own work to align with these human tendencies though a lens of genuine care and authenticity. Key Points We've evolved through history to seek guidance from those who appear miraculous. Surprise and worthiness are two indicators of what people perceive as miraculous vs. simply chance. The elements of your narrative are faders on a mixing board. Raise and lower different elements of the story to get the right mix. Make a list of strengths and weaknesses and don’t mention your weaknesses for a week. Reframe how some of your weakness might be strengths. Develop your story using the elements of theatre. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480) How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem (episode 549) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Ruth Gotian: The Success Factor Ruth Gotian has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentorship and leadership development. In 2021, she was selected as one of 30 people worldwide to be named to the Thinkers50 Radar List, where she was described as a “Prolific mentor and educator, leading important research into the secrets of success.” She is a semi-finalist for the Forbes 50 Over 50 list and has coached and mentored hundreds of people throughout her career. In addition to being published in academic journals, Ruth is a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today, where she writes about optimizing success. She is the Chief Learning Officer in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is a faculty member. Ruth is the author of The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance*. In this conversation, Ruth and I discuss how leaders can genuinely connect with (and retain) their top performers. We explore the difference these employees make in organizations and what’s unique about how they approach work and their careers. Ruth then suggests a number of practical steps to engage high performers genuinely to develop them well and benefit the entire organization. Key Points High achievers can produce up to 400 percent more than the average employee. Promotions, diplomas, and awards may be starting points for high performers, but they are not ending points. Leading high performers well requires you to align with their intrinsic motivation. Offer high performers opportunities for exposure with visibility to senior leadership, strengths assignments, and decision-making. Provide autonomy to high performers. For them, the chase is as exciting as the win. They fear not trying more than failing. Recognize that internal professional development programs may not be sufficient for the demands of high performers. Support external opportunities they identify and connect with them during and after those experiences to further their learning (and yours). Bonus Audio How to maximize the benefit of sending high achievers to conferences Resources Mentioned The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance* by Ruth Gotian Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Six Ways Teaching Adults is Different than Teaching Kids (episode 3) What High Performers Aren’t Telling You, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 466) How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman (episode 554) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Amishi Jha: Peak Mind Amishi Jha is Director of Contemplative Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami. With grants from the Department of Defense and several private foundations, she leads research on the neural bases of attention and the effects of mindfulness-based training programs on cognition, emotion, resilience, and performance in education, corporate, elite sports, first-responder, and military contexts. She launched the first-ever study to offer mindfulness training to active duty military service members as they prepared for deployment. Her work has been featured in many outlets including TED, NPR, and Mindful Magazine. In addition, she has been invited to present her work to NATO, the UK Parliament, the Pentagon, and at the World Economic Forum. She is the author of Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day*. In this conversation, Amishi and I explore the importance of our attention and why harnessing it is essential for leaders. We dive into the neuroscience and how our brain is similar to a computer in how much we can hold at one time. Plus, Amishi provides us several practical starting points if we wish to do a better job of placing our attention in the most useful places. Key Points Attention is powerful, fragile, and trainable. Our working memory is like the RAM inside a computer — there’s only so much we can hold at a time. You experience what’s in your working memory, even if that doesn’t correlate to what’s right in front of you. If your working memory is full, it blocks the ability to encode or whatever you are trying to learn. A key tactic is to be aware of what’s in your working memory — and what you choose not to rewrite. Mindfulness practice can provide the white space for the space in our working memory that we need. Resources Mentioned Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day* by Amishi Jha Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Help Your Brain Learn, with Lisa Feldman Barrett (episode 513) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Tiziana Casciaro: Power, for All Tiziana Casciaro is a professor of organizational behavior at the Rotman School of Management of the University of Toronto. Her research on interpersonal and organizational networks and power dynamics has received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the Academy of Management and has been covered in the New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, and many other outlets. Tiziana advises organizations and professionals across industries and has been recognized by Thinkers50 as a management thinker most likely to shape the future of how organizations are managed and led. She is the author with Julie Battilana of Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business*. In this conversation, Tiziana and I explore the reality that many leaders face: the desire to discover what people want — but the challenge of actually determining this. Even when intentions are good, employees may not have the self-awareness to articulate what they what. We detail what the research shows us about what most people care about — and the practical steps we can all take in our organizations to surface this through familiarity and similarity. Key Points To be powerful in a relationship, it means having control over resources the other person values. Even if asked, people don’t always tell you what they need — either because they don’t trust you or because they aren’t self-aware. Much of the research literature concludes that almost all people have two basic needs: safety and self-esteem. To discover what people want, you need to earn trust. Competence and warmth two ways this happens. When forced to choose between the two, most people prefer warmth. To build warmth (and trust) use two key sources of interpersonal liking: familiarity and similarity. The six resources that address our basic needs of safety and self-esteem: Material resources Morality Achievement Status Autonomy Affiliation Resources Mentioned Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business* by Julie Battilana and Tiziana Casciaro Power, for All website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Sönke Ahrens: How to Take Smart Notes Sönke Ahrens is the creator of Take Smart Notes, a project dedicated to helping students, academics and nonfiction writers get more done - ideally with more fun and less effort. He has spent years researching and experimenting with different note-taking systems and his settled on a methodology called Zettlekasten. Sönke is a writer, coach, and academic -- and also the author of the bestselling book, How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers*. In this conversation, Sönke and I discuss how to move past the practice of simply reading and highlighting by beginning to seek meaning. We explore how you might create a system for doing this and how external scaffolding can help. Plus, we explain what notes might look like and how you can use them for an ongoing conversation with yourself — and perhaps others. Key Points Move past details and look for meaning. As we become familiar with something, we may start believing we understand it. Real thinking requires external scaffolding. It's not so much about saving information, but in making connections between the information. Your notes need not be long or numerous, but should spark (and continue) future conversations with yourself. Resources Mentioned How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers* by Sönke Ahrens Take Smart Notes Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How To Create a Personal Knowledge Management System, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 129) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) How to Use Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed) How to Enhance Your Credibility (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Alisa Cohn: From Start-Up to Grown-Up Alisa Cohn has been named the Top Startup Coach in the World by the Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, and many more. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc. named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in The New York Times. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business*. In this conversation, Alisa and I discuss the difficult reality that most leaders need to face: saying goodbye to an employee. We detail the mindset you need in preparation for letting someone go. Alisa also helps us with specific language that will help you follow-though on a conversation and help everybody move on — and move forward. Key Points Our human tendency is often to side-step problems that we need to address. By the time you take action to fire somebody, you are likely months late. Just because someone was effective in the role previously (or in the last role) doesn’t mean their role is right for them today. It’s helpful to be prescriptive in conversations leading up to firing on exactly your expectations — and the actions the other party has agreed to. There’s no way to fire someone without it being awkward and painful. You’ll need to make peace with that before you take action. Resources Mentioned From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business* by Alisa Cohn Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Begin Michael Bungay Stanier distills big, complex ideas into practical, accessible knowledge for everyday people so they can be a force for change. His books have sold over a million copies, and The Coaching Habit was a Wall Street Journal bestseller. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. Michael is the founder of Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that helps organizations transform from advice-driven to curiosity-led action. His new book is titled How to Begin: Start Doing Something That Matters*. In this conversation, Michael and I discuss how to make progress when starting something new. We explore the value in looking back at what you’ve already done to support you on what’s next. Plus, Michael highlights the key principles in running effective experiments that transition into new practices. Key Points Fire bullets at the start. Then, fire cannonballs. Discover what your history reveals about your future self. It will open up a window to who you are that will help you when moving on something new. When experimenting, don’t make the experiment bigger or more complex than it needs to be. Avoid putting too much risk in the experiment or investing too much in its success. We have the most learning when we’re struggling with something. Resources Mentioned How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stanier How to Begin overview Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Jennifer Moss: The Burnout Epidemic Jennifer Moss is an award-winning journalist, author, and international public speaker. She is a nationally syndicated radio columnist, reporting on topics related to happiness and workplace well-being. She is also a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in HuffPost, Forbes, the Society for Human Resource Management, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review. Jennifer’s prior book, Unlocking Happiness at Work, received the distinguished UK Business Book of the Year Award. She also sits on the Global Happiness Council. She is the author of The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It*. In this conversation, Jennifer and I explore a few misconceptions about burnout — and also how curiosity and empathy can help to reduce it. We discuss a few key questions leaders can ask to gain insight on how to help. Plus, we detail how to avoid confirmation bias through generic interactions. Key Points Self-care doesn’t cure burnout. Curiosity increases empathy — and empathy from leaders is a fabulous antidote to burnout. There are two kinds of curiosity, epistemic and perceptual. True empathy comes from a focus on epistemic interactions. Go beyond the generic, “How are you?” and instead get more specific with a request like, “Name a high — and a low.” Doing these with a team can help surface how to help. Assume the best. It’s ok to say, “Thank you for sharing this with me. I don’t have any advice. I just want to listen and learn.” Resources Mentioned The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It* by Jennifer Moss Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Comments (30)

Karen

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Nov 5th
Reply

David Lanchart

Thank you Dave for sharing your very touching personal story. My thoughts are with you and your family.

Oct 22nd
Reply (1)

mamadkazemi

Nice

Apr 24th
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Ben P. Ashton

great conversation. found this really helpful.

Apr 20th
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RebeccaMelton at MaryKay

SOOOOOO GOOD!!

Aug 6th
Reply

Patrecia Sapulette

Thanks Dave and Peter !!! this answer a question troubled me for some time!

Apr 5th
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Patrecia Sapulette

so beautiful!!! Thanks!

Apr 2nd
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Patrecia Sapulette

oh my! this is gold!!!

Feb 2nd
Reply (1)

Patrecia Sapulette

great!!!

Feb 1st
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Sonam Sherpa

bullshit podcast, waste of time

Dec 12th
Reply (1)

Ed Troxell

“Learning is messy” 👌

Jul 29th
Reply (1)

Frank Boucher (FBoucheros)

Nice episode explaining how a group can help you to grow and become a better "you", and that blogging is still a great way to structure/ but together our thoughts.

Jul 22nd
Reply

Özgür Yüksel

This is an awesome episode. Loads of golden notes in here..

Jun 9th
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Jenae Adams

I loved this so much! I'm a millennial that's currently up for mentoring adoption. I own a business that specializes in finding and removing the blocks in a business that hold back their sales team from being successful and also removing the subconscious mental blocks that hold back the employees and team members from being confident and successful. The business name is Carefree Confidence, LLC and the website is www.carefree-confidence.com I would be so grateful to have a mentor that can help me move forward and I can help you grow leadership skills and the understanding of female millennials.

May 9th
Reply

Keiichi Minami

Excelleent podcast!

May 2nd
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Tudor Popa

how come not all episodes available? looking for 139. thanks

Jan 15th
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David Lanchart

I love Lisa's perspective on looking outward instead of always looking inwards.

Dec 14th
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Kronen Bing

very informative and told in an accessible and engaging way

Nov 29th
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Harriet Cameron

Brilliant podcast. Thank you for sharing your insight! Harriet, New Zealand

Oct 24th
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Nory Protacio

hi Dave. do you have any episodes on delivering bad news?

Apr 27th
Reply (1)
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