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The Audio Long Read

Author: The Guardian

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The Audio Long Read podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more
627 Episodes
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We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: The discovery of Hawaii Sign Language in 2013 amazed linguists. But as the number of users dwindles, can it survive the twin threats of globalisation and a rift in the community? By Ross Perlin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Between accidents, disease and bad weather, farm animals are prey to so many disasters that dedicated professionals are called out to dispose of the casualties. It’s a grim task, and one that’s only getting more difficult. By Bella Bathurst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
I’ve long nursed vague plans of moving back to China for a few years, to solidify my place there. But with each year that passes in the US, such a move gets harder and harder to make. By Angela Qian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: For years, she has accused French journalists of bias against her family and her party. Yet Marine Le Pen has managed to lead the far-right Front National into the political mainstream – and she couldn’t have done it without the press. By Scott Sayare. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Whitechapel Bell Foundry dates back to 1570, and was the factory in which Big Ben and the Liberty Bell were made. But it shut in 2017, and a fight for its future has been raging ever since. By Hettie O’Brien. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Something is badly wrong at the heart of one of Britain’s most important ministries. How did it become so broken? By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: After arriving in Britain as a child, I fought hard to feel like I belonged. Now it feels that the status of migrants like me is permanently up for review by Ismail Einashe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
In 2016, the US state department said it had uncovered a fake embassy in Accra that had been issuing a stream of forged visas. The story went viral – but all was not as it seemed. By Yepoka Yeebo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Before the 17th century, people did not think of themselves as belonging to something called the white race. But once the idea was invented, it quickly began to reshape the modern world. By Robert P Baird. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: Scientists have identified 2 million species of living things. No one knows how many more are out there, and tens of thousands may be vanishing before we have even had a chance to encounter them. By Jacob Mikanowski. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Could such a large amount of money end the Covid pandemic? Eradicate disease? Provide universal healthcare and fund vaccine research? By Rowan Hooper. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
On the Guardian’s 200th anniversary, our editor-in-chief sets out how media can help rebuild a better world beyond Covid by Katharine Viner.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: Luxembourg has shown how far a tiny country can go by serving the needs of global capitalism. Now it has set its sights on outer space. By Atossa Araxia Abrahamian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
In 2019, the body of a man fell from a passenger plane into a garden in south London. Who was he? By Sirin Kale. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
After a painful breakup and the death of her father, one writer retreated to the coast of Brittany in winter where she tested the powerful effects of a daily swim in the icy sea. By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2018: It’s time to end a system that excludes the less privileged from the arts, media and politics. By Amalia Illgner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Travel bloggers have flocked to Pakistan in recent years – but have some of them become too close to the authorities? By Samira Shackle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
It’s hard to convey the full depth and range of the trauma, the chaos and the indignity that people are being subjected to. Meanwhile, Modi and his allies are telling us not to complain. By Arundhati Roy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
This year marks a very special moment in the history of the Guardian. It is 200 years since the first incarnation of the newpaper, a four-page weekly, first appeared in Manchester. In honour of this we have dug very deep into our archive to bring you a piece from 100 years ago. In May 1921, the great Manchester Guardian editor CP Scott wrote a leading article to mark the centenary of the paper. The essay, published under the headline “A Hundred Years”, is still recognised around the world as the blueprint for independent journalism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Jeffrey Karp is at the forefront of a new generation of scientists using nature’s blueprints to create breakthrough medical technologies. Can bioinspiration help to solve some of humanity’s most urgent problems? By Laura Parker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
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Comments (71)

Paul Towning

Beautifully articulated. A revealing but never prurient, personal story of those cross cultural family experiences that illustrates how interconnected our world is and at the same time so separate and distinct. Felt like ten minutes, wished it had been longer. Great tip about the ubiquitous nature of Alipay in China today and the difficulty of registering a phone for this purpose of you're not a resident national.

Jun 12th
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Katy

Ridiculous conspiracy voice :D

May 24th
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Ricky dorazio

Another journalist making out that everybody that has an alternavate view on covid to the one side of the story that the media has been spreading is a crazy, stupid and a conspiracy theorist. In reality lots of intelligent and educated people feel that the reaction to covid has been exaggerated and in the long run will cause more harm that good. Don’t listen. More lazy journalism.

May 6th
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Rebecca Henderson

What did everyone consider the takeaway? I've got ,"Respect the other person. Don't humiliate them. Try to give them an easy out to change their mind." Did others get something else? Or have practical ideas for how to implement?

Apr 13th
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Sepehr Soleyman Fallah

If only the quality was as before....

Nov 9th
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little boxes

Oh the irony. this episode was interrupted by an advert... for Asda.

Sep 26th
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Top Clean

Thanks for the good "article" / episode on how we treat pets and animals. i like this in the wild.!. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AicEBRYFTeI https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SzIb10D_5Rw

Sep 19th
Reply (1)

Bruno Vieira Pereira

Fortunately, as a result of this pandemic, more and more people are recognising the vital role which those who work in ICU play and also, the importance of their job in order to save as many lives as possible.

Aug 18th
Reply (1)

Top Clean

I think the kids in cages deserve more attention, care and there parents. In the long-term view they can be like any normal person with care, if not they can be damaged for life, with a lifetime of suffering. https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/07/11/written-testimony-kids-cages-inhumane-treatment-border

Aug 7th
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Top Clean

During his first State of the Union address, President Donald Trump vowed to keep the Guantanamo Bay detention center open – a move that starkly contrasts the plans of his predecessor. ... Since its opening 16 years ago, the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba has imprisoned nearly 800 people. It has been decried by critics on both sides of the aisle who say the prisoners – alleged terrorists and people with suspected ties to terrorist organizations – suffer from human rights violations within its walls. https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/02/13/guantanamos-ugly-taint-us-diplomacy Definition of gestapo: a secret-police organization employing underhanded and terrorist methods against persons suspected of disloyalty. See, e.g., the Trump/Barr activities in Poland - sorry in Portland. ... And the slavery is still here in the U.S. disguise as the profitable state, federal and private Prison's, where prisoners they work for less so they make outside free working people being a obsolete workforces. ... And yes perhaps one reason detainees are not being released is that over 70 percent of detainees are held in private, for-profit facilities⁠. Two of the largest of those, GEO Group and CoreCivic (Corrections Corporation of America). Despite their failure to provide safe conditions for detainees, the GEO earned $2.3 billion in 2018, mostly from U.S. government contracts, which is more than any other ICE contractor. AmeriKKKa and Canada have the most people incarceration in the world. https://allthatsinteresting.com/private-prisons-us-stats ... We see that Profit is the main game here. Then ask yourself how, during a global pandemic, in the worst economy since the Great Depression, with 45.5 million Americans filing for unemployment, the total net worth of U.S. billionaires has climbed from $2.9 trillion to $3.5 trillion. And a Trillion is freaking BIG.!. https://www.thecalculatorsite.com/images/articles/20170628-trillion-dollars-in 1 million seconds equal 11 and 1/2 days. 1 billion seconds equal 31 and 3/4 years. 1 trillion seconds equal 31,710 years. GOP is Greedy Oppressive Predators! But thanks for a good episode and podcast. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

Aug 7th
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Joanna Linley

What a powerful and emotional story. How brave of Jenny to share what she's been through. Wishing you all the very best for the rest of your pregnancy.

Aug 3rd
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Lizzie Sherwood-Smith

Absolutely loved this, particularly about the screen posed to be providing a new level of safety for clients to disclose.

May 23rd
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Gabriel

Thank you again for this article. Also, as a fan of the long reads, it's nice to hear a new voice reading the articles. The voice of the orator is gentle and clear. However, without wanting to be at all offensive, and I want to state that I do really love the Irish accent, it is often quite confusing that he intonates the ends of each sentence upward, as one would at a question in other English accents. And it makes listening to the articles a bit more of a challenge.

Apr 25th
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Robert Mol

This time, I had to stop listening. Not because of the story - it's the voice. It sounds as if it's a computer voice. Couldn't listen to it, I'm very sorry.

Apr 17th
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Nonker

Who does the author work for? Could be Monsanto, or some coalition of agribusinesses nervous that profits associated with the chemicals and proprietary genetics used in industrial farming practices might decline. Much information goes mysteriously unmentioned here. While the growth in population means we will need more food, how it is grown is important. The piece pretends the choice is between industrial agriculture and “rewilding” and does not mention the significant dangers of industrial agricultural practices. Neonicotinoids are associated with the decline in honeybees, and without them, farming is in trouble. Similarly, no-till practices have major flood-protecting properties that will be more and more essential during climate change. Conventional farming erodes soil. What good is big ag if we doesn’t have enough soil to farm? And the article conveniently does not mention that the lower yields that happen when farmers switch to no-till and cover cropping are similar to those of industrial farming after a transition period of a two to three years - a transition that will require government support, but will be well worth it given the benefits of preserving healthy soil, reducing erosion and flooding and pollution, and keeping our valuable pollinators alive and healthy.

Apr 2nd
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W South

ugh ..not somewhere I'm sure I want to explore

Mar 10th
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Dianne

What a brilliant story about a wonderful couple. This must be one of my favourite podcasts I've heard on castbox to date. A refreshing escape from the harsh media spotlight of late.

Feb 28th
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James

Fantastic article/episode. Very special people.

Jan 31st
Reply

Omid Shy

Interesting read

Jan 12th
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Ali Smith

,,.,

Dec 31st
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