Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
How should we be expecting to live as we start to adapt to the changing climate? In our race to resilience, are there limitations to what we shoud expect to see on our supermarket shelves, escalated by the Ukraine war and cost of living crisis? And what real progress have we made since COP26? To help build momentum after the UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, University of Cambridge Professor Emily So worked with the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) podcast team to engage with academics, policy professionals, and other climate experts to host a new mini-series (season 6) focussing on climate adaption. We're so pleased to share with you the highlights of the series, produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, part of the Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge.  The mini-series was edited and produced by CSaP's Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series was supported by CSaP's Executive Director Rob Doubleday and CSaP's Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here.
How can our built environment adapt to the impacts of climate change? What needs to be done to decarbonise the industry to future-proof our urban, rural and coastal environments and what can new development look like in our race to resilience?  In the final episode of our 4-part mini-series - Science, Policy and Climate Resilience - Host Emily So is joined by Chris Wise, an award winning designer and Senior Director at the consultancy Expedition Engineering, and Peter Fisher, Director at the architectural firm Bennetts Associates. Both are certified B Corporations, businesses that meet high standards of social and environmental performance. -- Season 6 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Further reading on this episode: About Expedition engineering consultancy:https://expedition.uk.com/about/ About Bennetts Associates: https://www.bennettsassociates.com/about-us/ B Lab's 'B Corp Certification': https://bcorporation.uk/b-corp-certification/ About UK Green Building Council (UKGBC): https://www.ukgbc.org/about-us/ About Space for Architecture, Carbon and Environment (SpACE): https://www.space-edinburgh.com/ The Race to Zero Campaign: https://unfccc.int/climate-action/race-to-zero-campaign Mark Carney on private sector commitment for climate finance (COP26): https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/11/1104812 About the National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS): https://www.nabers.gov.au/about/what-nabers Article: Embodied carbon vs operational carbon: What’s the difference, and why does it matter? Design Museum exhibition: Waste Age: What Can Design Do? Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
How can people and businesses learn to adapt and live with climate change? What behaviours should be adopted, what conversations should be had and actions taken at a global, national and local level? In the third episode of our mini-series - Science, Policy & Climate Resilience - Host Emily So, Professor of Architectural Engineering, University of Cambridge, is joined by Professor Dame Julia King, Baroness Brown of Cambridge, member of the House of Lords, Chair of the Adaptation Committee of the Committee on Climate Change and Chair of the Carbon Trust. Plus Emily Farnworth, Co-Director of the Centre for Climate Engagement at Hughes Hall, University of Cambridge.  -- Season 6 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Further reading on this episode:  The Climate Change Committee's website: https://www.theccc.org.uk/ Article on supply chain risks stemming from climate change. Second UK Climate Change Risk Assessment report (2017). Third UK Climate Change Risk Assessment report (2022). Government announcement regarding their planned phase-out of petrol and diesel cars. Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures website. The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review. Natural England blog: Biodiversity Net Gain - more than just a number. 9  things you can do about climate change - The Grantham Institute - Climate Change and the Environment. The National Digital Twin programme’s Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo): https://digitaltwinhub.co.uk/credo/ Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
For our new 4-part mini-series - Science, Policy and Climate Resilience - Host Rob Doubleday is joined by our new Co-Host Emily So, Professor of Architectural Engineering, University of Cambridge. Season 6 is focusing on the race to resilience global climate campaign and how to accelerate climate priorities after COP26. In this second episode we're discussing how to finance climate actions and resilience, which has been highlighted as one of the main climate priorities for 2022. Hosts Rob Doubleday and Emily So are joined by Andrew Coburn, the CEO of Risilience, a platform dedicated to transforming organisations into new business models and Rowan Douglas, Head of the Climate and Resilience Hub at the consulting firm Willis Towers Watson.  -- Season 6 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode: Net Zero Finance summit website BBC News article on the Global Methane Pledge UN Climate Change article on COP26 agricultural progress Insurance Development Forum website ClimateWise (at the Centre for Sustainable Finance) website  Global Resilience Index website Coalition for Climate Resilience Investment website The Coalition for Climate Resilience Investment's Physical Climate Risk Assessment Methodology (aimed at improving the integration of physical climate risks into investment appraisal practices) Article in The Economist on the effects of heatwaves (in chilly European countries) on voting patterns Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
For our new mini-series - Science, Policy and Climate Resilience - Host Rob Doubleday is joined by our new Co-Host Emily So, Professor of Architectural Engineering, University of Cambridge. Season 6 is focusing on the race to resilience global climate campaign and how to accelerate climate priorities after COP26. In this first episode, Rob and Emily are joined by Dr Emily Shuckburgh, Climate Scientist and Director at Cambridge Zero, the University of Cambridge’s climate initiative, Amy Mount, a climate policy and politics expert who has worked in government, NGOs and now advises philanthropies, and Dimitri Zenghelis, Economist and Co-Founder of the Wealth Economy Project at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy in Cambridge.  -- Season 6 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode: The Glasgow Climate Pact – Key Outcomes from COP26. Glasgow Climate Pact: https://unfccc.int/documents/310475 Last IPPC Report published before COP26––Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis. The Paris Agreement: https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement Cambridge Zero work on cascading risks associated with climate change. Bennett Institute working paper – Climate and Fiscal Sustainability: Risks and Opportunities.  The Climate Change Act: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2008/27/contents UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2022: https://bit.ly/3Py8vQH Climate Change Committee New Article – It's Time to Turn the Tide on UK Adaptation Action Climate Change Committe Post-COP26 report – COP26: Key Outcomes and Next Steps for the UK. UN Convention on Biological Diversity: ​https://bit.ly/3MBTbRm Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
We're delighted to be able to share with you the highlights of the University of Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy's fifth podcast season, which explores how science advice, data and evidence are used by decision-makers in government. This series has been produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, part of the Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here.
In the final episode of our season, Science Advice & Government, host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by Sharon Peacock, Director of the COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) Consortium and Professor of Public Health and Microbiology in the Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, and James Wood, Head of Cambridge Vet School and infectious disease epidemiologist. The episode explores how science advice has been used in the UK's response to the current COVID-19 pandemic and what lessons can be learnt to help prepare for future pandemics.   -- Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode (click on the below):  COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) consortium. COG-Train. Exercise Cygnus. Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
How have scientists contributed to UK government decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic? What are the structures and mechanisms that have drawn science into the policy process? In today’s episode we’re exploring what the past two years have been like for the scientists involved in government and SPI-M, the experts providing the advice based on COVID modelling and epidemiology.     In today’s episode, host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by Julia Gog, Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of Cambridge, who has been heavily involved throughout the pandemic within SPI-M, the specialist advisory group on modelling pandemics which feeds into the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) process. Plus, Sir John Aston, Harding Professor of Statistics in Public Life, University of Cambridge. He was Chief Scientific Adviser in the Home Office from 2017-2020 and during the COVID pandemic was heavily involved in SAGE and advising the Secretary of State in the Home Office.  As part of our series on science advice and government, we’re looking ahead to the public inquiry into the government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic this spring. We hope the episodes will highlight lessons on what worked well, how scientific advice has helped governments make difficult decisions, and how this process can be improved for the future.  Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode:  Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling (SPI-M): https://bit.ly/35G8jgt Chief Scientific Advisors: https://bit.ly/3KzNPEY  Scientific evidence supporting the government response to coronavirus (COVID-19): https://bit.ly/3JhBaq1  Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
In today's uncertain world, the sixth episode of our series on science advice and government, explores how governments can better understand and respond to unforeseeable and challenging extreme risk scenarios, such as cyber hacking, biological hazards, climate change, and future pandemics following the COVID-19 outbreak. Host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by: -Lord Martin Rees, the UK's Astronomer Royal, a Cosmologist and Member of the House of Lords, which in December 2021 published the report, ‘Preparing for Extreme Risks, Building a Resilient Society’, which tackled some of the questions about how governments learn, react to, and prepare for extreme risks. -Suzanne Raine, an Affiliate Lecturer at the Centre for Geopolitics at the University of Cambridge. She was formerly a civil servant and was Head of the UK's Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre from 2015-2017.  -Dr Kristen MacAskill, an Assistant Professor in Engineering at the University of Cambridge. Her work is on the governance and resilience of infrastructure and she has spent years in industry looking at disaster response.  -- Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode: - House of Lords Risk Assessment and Risk Planning’s Report: Preparing for Extreme Risks: Building a Resilient Society -Cabinet Office Guidance: Risk Assessment: How the Risk of Emergencies in the UK is Assessed -National Risk Register 2020 -Introduction to the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre - Lord Martin Rees’ book about existential risks: On the Future: Prospects for Humanity Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
In the fifth episode of our new series on science advice and government, host Dr Rob Doubleday discusses how SAGE and modelling advice were used during the Nepal Earthquake in April 2015. He's joined by James Jackson, an Earthquake Geologist and Professor in Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge, and Professor Emily So, an Artchitectural Engineer and Director of the Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE). Both James and Emily work on earthquakes, what causes them and what damage they do.  - Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode: Summary Note of the SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies) meeting on the Nepal Earthquake, 27 April 2015 Scientific background on PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response): https://on.doi.gov/359qgn4 NSET (Earthquake Safe Communities in Nepal): https://www.nset.org.np/nset2012/ Final Report of the Earthquakes Without Frontiers project: https://bit.ly/3htYB37 Global Earthquake Model: https://www.globalquakemodel.org/ World Housing Encyclopaedia: http://www.world-housing.net/ Robin Spence and Emily So’s book: Why Do Buildings Collapse in Earthquakes: Building for Safety in Seismic Areas.  Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
In the fourth episode of our series on science advice and government, we look back a few decades at what lessons were learnt following the BSE outbreak (Mad Cow Disease) in the 1980s and 1990s. Plus how it led to the establishment of the Food Standards Agency (FSA). Host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by Dame Julia Unwin, who was appointed Deputy Chair of the FSA in 2003. Dame Julia's role was to co-lead the agency and develop its relationship with the government and most importantly, the public. In today's episode, Rob is also joined by Erik Millstone, a Professor at the University of Sussex, who's research focuses on the use of science and evidence in the governance of food safety and risk.  -- Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode: About the Food Standards Agency and their mission: https://bit.ly/FSAmission The Food Standards Agency: A Force for Change (White Paper proposing the Food Standards Agency). BSE: Risk, Science, and Governance by Patrick van Zwanenberg and Erik Millstone -- Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
In the third episode of our new podcast series on science advice and government, host Dr Rob Doubleday discusses the Ebola outbreak of 2014 and how the government used science and evidence in helping to tackle it. He's joined by three people who were closely involved at the time:   -Dame Sally Davies, Master of Trinity College Cambridge, who was Chief Medical Officer for England from 2010-2019 and co-chaired the SAGE process during the outbreak.  -Sir Oliver Letwin, an MP for over 20 years and was a Senior Minister in the Cabinet Office during the time.   -Professor Melissa Leach, Director of the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex. She's also an Anthropologist who has worked in West Africa and played a crucial role in bringing evidence from the social sciences into the government's response to Ebola.  -- Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge. CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick. Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here. -- Resources relevant to this episode:  Sage website: https://bit.ly/SAGEwebsite Ebola Response Anthropology Platform website: https://bit.ly/Ebolaanthropology Paper - Providing incentives to share data early in health emergencies: the role of journal editors UK Vaccine Network website: https://bit.ly/ukvaccnet Report by the Wellcome Trust and UK DIFD Joint Initiative on Epidemic Preparedness: Towards a People-Centred Epidemic Preparedness and Response: https://bit.ly/3glkZer.  Social Science and Humanitarian Action Platform website: https://www.socialscienceinaction.org/ Oliver Letwin's book: Apocalypse How?: Technology and the Threat of Disaster. -- Sign up to our CSaP newsletter by clicking here.
In the first episode of our new series, we’re exploring how science advice, data and evidence are used by decision makers in government. Throughout today’s episode, host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by Sir Patrick Vallance, UK Government Chief Scientific Adviser, and Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School. Season 5 is produced in partnership with the research project Expertise Under Pressure, Centre for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of Cambridge.  -- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Jessica Foster. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Researcher Nick Cosstick.  Podcast theme music by Transistor.fm. Learn how to start a podcast here.
In the final episode of our series on science and policy for Antarctica, space, and the deep ocean, Dr Rob Doubleday and expert guests explore the role these places play in geopolitics. Throughout this episode, we hear from Alice Millington, a policy intern here at CSaP; Royal Holloway Professor of Geopolitics Klaus Dodds; King's College London space policy expert Dr Mark Hilborne; and University of Toronto environmental sociologist Professor John Hannigan.  -- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
In the fifth episode of our series on Science and Policy for Antarctica, Space, and the Deep Ocean, we're discussing human experiences of space and Antarctica. Throughout today's episode, host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by CSaP Policy Intern Alice Millington; astronomer and Associate Professor at Nottingham Trent University Dr Daniel Brown; Dr Rebecca Priestley, who is an interdisciplinary scholar at Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington and author of Fifteen Million Years in Antarctica; and the University of Tasmania's Dr Hanne Nielsen and Professor Elizabeth Leane. -- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
In the third episode of our 6-part mini series exploring science and policy questions in deep oceans, space, and the Antarctic, we're discussing climate change in the Antarctic and in our oceans, and exploring how scientists - including those working with space technologies - are studying our changing climate. This week, host Dr Rob Doubleday is joined by atmospheric physicist and former co-director of the Grantham Institute Professor Joanna Haigh; oceanographer and Associate Head of the National Oceanography Centre's Marine Physics and Ocean Climate group Professor Penny Holliday, Professor John King, who is an atmospheric scientist with the the British Antarctic Survey's Atmosphere, Ice and Climate Research Group and an Honorary Professor, at the University of East Anglia's School of Environmental Sciences; and CSaP Policy Intern Anthony Lindley -- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
In the second episode of our 6-part mini series exploring science and policy questions in deep oceans, space, and the Antarctic, we're exploring the risks and policy questions posed by ways in which human interactions with and exploit these environments.  Throughout this episode, Dr Rob Doubleday and expert guests explore the risks and policy questions involved in deep sea mining; how scientists are managing the delicate balance between protecting fragile Antarctic environments and the environmental impact of conducting research within them; and the growing problem of space debris.  This week, we are joined by political geographer Dr John Childs from the University of Lancaster, the British Antarctic Survey's Environmental Research and Monitoring Manager Dr Kevin Hughes, technology governance expert Dr Nikita Chiu, and CSaP Policy Intern Anthony Lindley -- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
In CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast's latest mini-series, we are exploring some of the opportunities and challenges facing scientists and policymakers working on issues related to Antarctica, the ocean depths, and near space. Recent advances in technologies have allowed humanity to explore and interact with these areas like never before, and in the first episode of this series host Dr Rob Doubleday sat down with experts to learn about some of the recent technological advances in these fields. We were joined throughout the episode by Dr Graham Turnock, Chief Executive of the UK Space Agency, Dr Julie Robidart, who is the Group Head for Ocean Technology and Engineering at the National Oceanography Centre, and Michael Rose, Head of Science Engineering at the British Antarctic Survey. This episode was introduced by Anthony Lindley, a CSaP Policy Intern and autonomous systems science researcher at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton at the University of Southampton.   --- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
In CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast's latest mini-series, we are exploring some of the opportunities and challenges facing scientists and policymakers working on issues related to Antarctica, the ocean depths, and near space. Recent advances in technologies have allowed humanity to explore and interact with these areas like never before. Over the course of six episodes, we will explore topics ranging from resource exploitation and technology for extreme environments, to geopolitics and conservation.  These episodes will be released in March and April of 2021.  --- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Interns Alice Millington and Anthony Lindley.
In the final episode of our four-part mini series exploring Science, Policy and Genetic Technologies, host Dr Rob Doubleday sat down with Dr Jonathan Roberts - who is currently a researcher in the Society and Ethics Research Group at the Wellcome Campus and a NHS Genetic Counsellor at Addenbrooke’s Hospital; the PHG Foundation's Alison Hall; and University of Cambridge sociologist Professor Sarah Franklin to explore some of the regulatory, ethical and societal implications of genetic technologies for the field of medicine.  --- CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast is hosted by CSaP Executive Director Dr Rob Doubleday, and is edited and produced by CSaP Communications Coordinator Kate McNeil. Research for this series is also supported by CSaP Policy Intern Alice Millington. If you have questions you would like us to address in a future week, please email enquiries@csap.cam.ac.uk. Music and sound effects used in this season of CSaP: The Science & Policy Podcast are courtesy of FreeSound.org. This episode features sound effects from PannChie and smacks999.
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store