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Was Jesus a Mushroom?

Was Jesus a Mushroom?

2022-10-0555:45

You have heard the quote, “Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” Our guest today – Dr. J. Christian Greer – has made it his life’s work to ensure we understand the history of psychedelic culture and learn from it. In our interview, you can hear the passion Greer has for this branch of religious history. We discuss psychedelic-assisted churches, the Grateful Dead fandom, and the global history of psychedelic spirituality. Why is understanding history important to the average person getting involved in psychedelics today? Greer hopes that society can return to the knowledge that psychedelics have always been an integral part of human culture, both as a source of healing and religious exultation. As it pertains to the current psychedelic renaissance, in Greer’s words, “we don't learn anything. We just remember what's always been.”“Let us focus on the sublime affection that love brings to us all.”Dr. J. Christian Greer is a scholar of Religious Studies specializing in the global history of psychedelic spirituality. While a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard Divinity School, he led a series of research seminars that culminated in the creation of the Harvard Psychedelic Walking Tour, a free audio guide detailing how the Harvard community has shaped the modern history of psychedelic culture. His latest book, Kumano Kodo: Pilgrimage to Powerspots (OSGH Press), analyzes pilgrimage folklore that animates the rainforest landscapes of Japan's Kii peninsula, and his forthcoming book, Angelheaded Hipsters: Psychedelic Militancy in Nineteen Eighties North America (Oxford University Press), explores the expansion of psychedelic culture in the late Cold War era. He is currently a lecturer at Stanford University.Show notes:* The history of psychedelic culture* “The Grateful Dead,” psychedelics, and spirituality* The importance of the past in psychedelic history* How psychedelics can help us heal our wounds* The origins of religion and psychedelics* Jesus was a mushroom? What does that mean?* Academic suicide– what happens when scholars speak up about psychedelics* Are we building towards a change in culture with the Psychedelic Renaissance?* Microdosing throughout history* The importance of inner research* The “stoned ape” theory* Real power is togethernessLinks and references:* Psychedelic Wisdom* Psychedelic Medicine* Timothy Leary* The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross by John Allegro* Books by J. Christian GreerThank you for reading Mind Body Health & Politics. This post is public so feel free to share it.Want the episode transcript and video? Join our Tribe!Have a Healing Story to Share?We’d love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics.Mind Body Health & Politics is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
Ever wondered about the uses for psychedelic medicines such as LSD, psilocybin, Ayahuasca, and MDMA? How to use them, how to integrate their effects in to your every day life, or what potential health risks there are? Our guest this week – Dr. Rick Strassman – has the answers, fresh off of his marathon 4-hour-long appearance on the Joe Rogan Experience. Well, we only went for 2 hours, but that was a new record for my program.Following the release of his newest book, The Psychedelic Handbook: A Practical Guide to Psilocybin, LSD, Ketamine, MDMA, and Ayahuasca, Strassman discusses his ideas on the big four and everything in between. “I think you need to be open-minded about your experiences.”A native of Los Angeles, Dr. Strassman obtained his undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He trained in general psychiatry at UC Davis in Sacramento and took a clinical psychopharmacology research fellowship at UC San Diego. Joining the faculty at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in 1984, his clinical research with melatonin discovered its first known function in humans. Between 1990-1995 he performed the first new US clinical research with psychedelic drugs in a generation. His studies involved DMT, and to a lesser extent psilocybin, and received federal and private funding. From 1995-2008 he practiced general psychiatry in the community mental health and the private sectors. He has authored or co-authored nearly 50 peer-reviewed papers, has served as guest editor and reviewer for numerous scientific journals and consulted to various government, non-profit, and for-profit entities. His book DMT: The Spirit Molecule (2001) has sold more than 250,000 copies, been translated into 14 languages, and is the basis of a successful independent documentary that he co-produced. In 2008, he co-authored Inner Paths to Outer Space. He has also written DMT and the Soul of Prophecy (2014) and his first novel, Joseph Levy Escapes Death, appeared in 2019. His latest book, The Psychedelic Handbook, came out in August 2022. Dr. Strassman is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the UNM School of Medicine and lives in Gallup, New Mexico.Show notes:A visionary in psychedelic medicine, Dr. Rick Strassman Leo Zeff and Richard’s interaction with him Good vs. evil in the world How a medicine that facilitates empathy (MDMA) can bolster racism, misogyny, white supremacy, and hate Rick Strassman’s motivation for writing the Psychedelic Handbook The four major psychedelic medicines Ketamine for treatment-resistant depression and other conditions The difference between a “guide” and a “sitter” The benefits of psilocybin and LSD The risk of coming unraveled Richard’s experience with DMT and the universe The hallmark of any full psychedelic experience is that it is more real than real Marijuana paranoia The cardiovascular effects of MDMA Stimulated imagination that comes from psychedelics Is "psychedelic tourism" safe? Salvia Divinorum The importance of reading, studying psychology, and religionThree important questions to ask yourself when taking psychedelics Micro-dosingLet’s talk integration Links and references:Psychedelic WisdomPsychedelic MedicineSecret Chief Revealed (Leo Zeff)The Psychedelic Handbook Thank you for reading Mind Body Health & Politics. This post is public so feel free to share it.Want the episode transcript and video? Join our Tribe!Have a Healing Story to Share?We’d love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics.(Learn more about Wilbur Hot Springs)Mind Body Health & Politics is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
Almost every person interviewed on this show has talked about one thing; the overwhelming sense of unity they feel after using psychedelic medicines. Our guest- Tommy Pool- is no different. Looking back on his first trip with LSD, he remembers the closeness he felt with the friends around him. Now, many years later, he believes he is much more open, insightful, creative, and grounded because of psychedelics. Having used (and sometimes misused) these drugs as a teen “sub rosa,” and in light of new legislation in states like Colorado and increased national support, Tommy feels it is time to speak openly about the lasting benefits found with psychedelic medicines.“To take that risk and be willing to see things in a different way... [It’s] Love. And as far as I can see, everything that you've talked about, it's love. "Tommy came to us as a listener of this program. He heard our call for stories and felt compelled to share his. He is a psychotherapist and addiction specialist with approximately 30 years in the field working to heal others, and credits his early drug use for his career path and life purpose. While he knows there is a risk to speaking out about alternative medicines and psychedelic-assisted therapy- especially in his home state of Texas- Tommy feels this is the next chapter of his life. By sharing his story, openly joining the psychedelic community, and learning from other pioneers in the field, Tommy hopes to bring new awareness to the vast benefits he has experienced firsthand. We hope listening to his journey will inspire others to speak out and share their experiences as well. Every story of healing strengthens the bond we share and is a welcome addition to the psychedelic renaissance we now find ourselves in.Show notes:- Tommy’s first experience with psychedelics (9:16)- What happened if he got caught with drugs growing up in Texas (16:24)- Tommy Pool’s purpose in life- to heal others (18:37)- The use of psychedelic medicines as part of the healing process (22:13)- After a 10 year hiatus, Tommy experimented with psychedelics again (33:29)- What happened to change Tommy’s attitude toward these substances (35:21)- The sense of unity that comes from psychedelic experiences (38:01)- The research supporting psychedelic medicine is growing (41:37)- Do people in Texas believe in Organic Food? (44:05)- Living in Texas, Tommy attributes the use of psychedelics to his open mindedness (50:58)Links and references:Psychedelic WisdomPsychedelic Medicine Thank you for reading Mind Body Health & Politics. This post is public so feel free to share it.Want the episode transcript and video? Join our Tribe! Have a Healing Story to Share?We’d love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics. Send stories to: producer@mindbodyhealthpolitcs.org Mind Body Health & Politics is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
Dr. Richard Louis Miller is an American Clinical Psychologist, Founder of Wilbur Hot Springs Health Sanctuary, and broadcaster who hosts the Mind Body Health & Politics talk radio program from Mendocino County, California. Dr. Miller was also Founder and chief clinician of the nationally acclaimed, pioneering, Cokenders Alcohol and Drug Program. Dr. Miller’s new book, Psychedelic Medicine, is based on his interviews with the most acclaimed experts on the topic. Mind Body Health & Politics radio broadcast is known for its wide ranging discussions on political issues and health. The program’s format includes guest interviews with prominent national authorities, scientists, best-selling authors, and listener call-ins. The programs offer a forum and soundboard for listeners to interact with the show and its guests. We invite you to listen to the latest broadcasts below or visit our many archived programs. We’d love to hear from you on political and health issues!
Did you know, if a government official takes a psychedelic treatment for PTSD, they lose their security clearance? After finding success with psychedelics for the treatment of his own PTSD, that government restriction is exactly what our guest, Jon Connors, hopes to lift. I sat down with Jon to hear about his personal experiences and what has inspired him to take action on a national level. This episode covers some heavy topics such as suicidal tendencies, depression, and isolation; but ends on a positive note with the healing psychedelic therapy can offer- and how to get involved so the people who need it most can access the help they deserve.“I do remember enjoying the creativity of the experience and then unlocked aspects of myself that, I think, I carry through much of my life”Jon Connors has embarked on his healing of Complex PTSD via psychedelic medicine since 2017. His experiences have inspired him to help others heal as well. He is the founder of Heal Government Insiders, a nonprofit initiative to amend United States National Security rules to allow insiders to heal their PTSD with psychedelics and retain their Security Clearance. He is a passionate activist for both restoring psyches and restoring the planet through regenerative agriculture. For the latter, Jon is also the founder of Blockchain for Ecology and loves using art to fundraise for social impact initiatives. Show notes: *Trigger warning- recollections of suicidal behaviors*A sailor, ecoactivist, and person undergoing psychedelic treatment- Introducing Jon Connors (9:32)The difference between Californians and Bostonians (13:13)Jon’s first experience with psychedelics at age 14 (14:20)An anecdote about Saudi Arabia and measurement (15:25)Why he never took these medicines again for decades (19:53)Entering into a psychotherapeutic endeavor (23:27)A bus accident memory turns out to be a repressed suicide attempt (28:46)His personal experience with Complex PTSD has inspired him to help others (31:35)The most powerful medication for depression is aerobic exercise (35:00)Isolation and COVID- we all are struggling (40:26)Martin Polanco and Ibogaine treatments (42:12)Heal Government Insiders- social initiative (43:55)The “demon rum” aka alcohol and alcoholism (45:33)“I don't want to go against the man. I want to heal the man” (49:05)Links and references:Duke University StudyDr. Martin PolancoAlbert Hofmann and his bike tripHeal Government InsidersThank you for reading Mind Body Health & Politics. This post is public so feel free to share it.Want the episode transcript and video? Join our Tribe!Have a Healing Story to Share?We’d love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics.Mind Body Health & Politics is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.
There is an old idiom that says when the pendulum goes one way, it's bound to swing back the other. Our guest, my old acquaintance and esteemed academic, Dr. Mariavittoria Mangini, has found that phrase applies to many aspects of her life. While we may be in precarious and difficult times, Mariavittoria has managed to stay positive, knowing that things can always change for the better. We sit down to have a full and wide-ranging conversation on politics, the state of the nation, privilege, and, of course, the profoundly lasting impression psychedelics have made on her life."I feel like I've had a lot more adventures and a lot more color and texture in my life because of those experiences."Mariavittoria Mangini, Ph.D., FNP has written extensively on the impact of psychedelic experiences in shaping the lives of her contemporaries and has worked closely with many of the most distinguished investigators in this field. She is one of the founders of the Women's Visionary Council, a nonprofit organization that supports investigations into non-ordinary forms of consciousness and organizes gatherings of researchers, healers, artists, and activists whose work explores these states. She is Professor Emerita in the School of Science, Allied Health, and Nursing at Holy Names University and a visiting scholar at the Berkeley Center for the Science of Psychedelics. For the last 50 years, she has been a part of the Hog Farm, a well-known communal family based in Berkeley and Laytonville, California.Show notes:Psychedelic elder and visionary- Mariavittoria Mangini- featured in the forthcoming book Psychedelic Wisdom (0:42)Mariavittoria's first experiences at the age of 16 (2:17)Realizations about death and the change in life course (3:18)The effects on her life happiness (4:33) The Haight Ashbury free clinic – a barefoot patient and later a Chairman of the Board (6:38)Will the American experiment in democracy last? (10:00)The problem with unremitting negativity in the media (10:22)The dangers of political polarization (12:48)Is religion the source of moralizing divisions? (14:44)Has America ever been a theocracy? (17:01)The dawn of open discussion of psychedelics and radical social changes of the past 30 years (21:21) The role of community radio in a democracy (25:27)Why communities need elders (31:24)What's going on with elders who lack wisdom? (34:32)The lingering effects of racism and white supremacy (37:00)The appropriate age to introduce children to psychedelics in a post-legalization world (45:30)The legacy of Betty Eisner and the idea of "Matrix" (46:29)The idealized view of universal access to psychedelics (48:47)How "matrix" effects one's protocol for administering psychedelics (50:27)What were the Eleusinian mysteries? (53:23)Links and references:Psychedelic WisdomBetty Eisner- "Set, Setting, and Matrix"Stephen JenkinsonAnn ShulginThe Way of the Psychonaut- Mariavittoria's interviewMariavittoria's previous episode on MBHP: Thank you for reading Mind Body Health & Politics. This post is public so feel free to share it.Want the full transcript and episode videos? Join our Tribe!Have a Healing Story to Share?We'd love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics.Mind Body Health & Politics is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
PART 2- Picking up where we left off, I continue the discussion with my daughter about psychedelic medicine and its place in our lives. This week, Evacheska has the opportunity to ask me more about my own experience and preferences. We talk about MDMA, LSD, Ketamine, Ayahuasca, and how I have used them in my life. Evacheska will be a reoccurring cohost for the show, and I am so excited to share this space with her.-Part one of this episode available here-The founder of Temple Sotto Luce, a community project designed to be a gateway to consciousness expansion and a higher state of being through the use of both traditional methods and approaches, and more esoteric tools, Evacheska is a certified Mindfulness and Meditation facilitator, Integrative Coach, Trauma and Somatics Practitioner, certified in Psych-K®, and is currently pursuing a degree in psychology at CUNY, studying yogic philosophy and the power of plant medicines. She has also recently returned from Peru where she studied with the Ayahuasca Foundation.Evacheska has dedicated her life's work and energy to creating and holding space for healing and expansion. She leverages her unique background abilities to create distinctive experiences focused on supporting each participant's internal work. Hear her unique perspective in this week's new episode and the conclusion to a two-part discussion between father and daughter.Show notes:Examples of experiences with Ayahuasca & LSD (0:00)Can you function in the normal world under the influence of ayahuasca? (4:15)Why you shouldn't look in a mirror (7:21)Signs that ayahuasca may not be for you (11:30)Consider the intention behind taking psychedelic medicine (12:15)Possible unpleasant side effects (14:11)If you regurgitate, does your body tell you it's poison? (15:38)George Bach's fighting therapy (17:23)Why LSD & MDMA are the best option (19:38)Where exactly is your consciousness seated? (27:33)Why MDMA may not be for you (29:30)Is amphetamine (MDMA) addictive? (33:27)Why ketamine is not a psychedelic and why it may not be for you (35:45)What's the difference between an entheogen and a psychedelic experience? (39:09)Call to Action For Stories (46:16)Links and references:In Conversation with Evacheska DeAngelis PART 1Psychedelic Wisdom Temple Sotto LuceThe Sage InstituteWant the full transcript and episode video? Join our Tribe!Have a Healing Story to Share? We'd love to hear from you on political and health issues, and are currently soliciting stories from individuals, couples, and families who would like to share their healing stories with psychedelics.Mind Body Health & Politics is a listener-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
Show Notes:How did Evacheska go from being an executive in the fashion world to an integrative counselor in the psychedelic world? (1:22)What was it like on the trip to Peru? (4:29)It's difficult for the average person to figure out which places offering psychedelic experiences in Peru, Jamaica, or Costa Rica are real and which ones are trying to make a quick buck. What did you do to ensure that the place you were visiting was righteous? (5:40)Why did Evacheska decide on Ayahuasca as opposed to taking LSD experiences or a series of psilocybin experiences? (10:38)Are the ceremonies and the setting around the psychedelic medicine as important or more important than the medicine itself? (13:08)What's the difference (approach, cultural, medicinal) between opioid prescriptions in American culture and psychedelic ceremonies? (13:50)Why do I need to go to the Peruvian jungle to have a ceremony? Why can't I have the same experience in my own neighborhood? (15:40)How does Evacheska use sound to open neural pathways and have a psychedelic journey, even without psychedelics? (17:46)How does a strong dose of psilocybin compare to an Ayahuasca experience? (21:14)What are the downsides of taking Ayahuasca? (24:15)Considering that Roland Griffith's research showed that a one-time dose of psilocybin still had an effect on depression patients after a year, what's the advantage of taking Ayahuasca three times a week for an entire month? (25:57)Could you imagine a future where people trained in LSD therapy or psilocybin therapy might prescribe taking those three times a week or a month? (27:37)What happens in an integration session? (29:03) Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
It is always fascinating to hear an artist's tale. This one is no different. Our guest, Kevin Barron, is one of the world's leading and prolific LSD blotter artists. His story is full of twists and turns, from working with the Rolling Stones to opening a cooking school in Greece, a federal sting operation, and the art he has created along the way.Kevin Barron experienced psychedelics for the first time at 17, and his perception of the world was changed forever. "As a budding artist, the whole experience was just this opening of perception. [He] was starting to look at things for the first time." While his initial careers were not in fine arts, he eventually found his way back to it. Through his journey Kevin worked for Island Records, basically discovered Cat Stevens, dabbled in the wine industry, and opened a cooking school in Greece; but it was in the late 80s when he found himself in San Francisco and returning to his artisan roots. Kevin was introduced to "Blotter Art", and immediately knew this was what he wanted to do. His first design known as the Holy Grail was met with huge success. Kevin then embarked on a widely successful, albeit tempestuous, career making LSD blotter art which ended in an arrest and lifetime ban from the U.S.A.Now Kevin is back creating new art and selling them as NFTs but in a new, revolutionary, way. Intrigued? Hear all about it in this week's new episode. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
Conversations with old friends warm the soul. This week my heart is full as I found myself catching up with my dear friend Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld and reminiscing about his "firsts" with mind-altering substances. We go back 57 years to hear about his experiences and journey with these substances, and how they changed the course of his life. Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld is a psychiatrist, author, lecturer, and popular underground newspaper columnist. He got his medical degree at the University of Miami School of Medicine, interned at Herrick Memorial Hospital (Berkeley, CA), and got his Master of Public Health from Yale University. While he has made a name for himself in the field of Psychology, you might know him better as "Dr. Hip". Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld wrote the popular underground column "Ask Dr. Hip" where people could submit their questions about sexuality and drugs. The anti-censorship philosophy that inspired the awakening of an underground press in the 1960s allowed Schoenfeld the freedom to answer those forbidden questions. He quickly became a popular source of reliable, common-sense information. Schoenfeld published his column from 1967 to 1973 and again from 1978 to 1979 in the underground, as well as in various mainstream newspapers including the Chicago Sun Times, Tampa Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and the San Francisco Examiner. Schoenfeld was a pioneering radio personality on Bay Area stations in the 1970s, and subsequent talk show doctors credit him for being a trailblazer. I, myself, was deeply inspired by Eugene's work. He is quite famous, and quite well liked, in the Bay Area for bringing medical science to popular newspapers.A true pioneer in advocating for the benefits of mind-altering medicine, Dr. Schoenfeld (AKA Dr. Hip) gets personal about his experiences with LSD and how his life has been enhanced in this week's new episode. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
It's All One Big *US*

It's All One Big *US*

2022-08-1801:08:16

In this week's episode, we bring you a thought-provoking discussion on the Psychedelic Renaissance. Our guest, historian and professor Erika Dyck, offers her perspective on where psychiatry and medical research intersect with psychedelic research. She also speaks about society's moral panic; what it means and what we should be doing about it. Erika is a Professor and a Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She was introduced to us by a previous guest, Paul Gootenberg, and we are so glad he made the introduction. With over 20 years of research under her belt, Erika is not only an expert on the history of psychedelic research but is also plugged into its future. She is the author or co-author of several books, including Psychedelic Psychiatry (2008); A Culture's Catalyst: Historical Encounters with Peyote and the Native American Church in Canada (2016); Psychedelic Prophets: The Letters of Aldous Huxley and Humphry Osmond (2018); and co-author of The Acid Room: the Psychedelic Trials and Tribulations of Hollywood Hospital (2022). She is also the guest editor of the Chacruna Series on women in the history of psychedelic plant medicines. At the University of Saskatchewan, Erika teaches courses in the history of medicine and madness. She is particularly interested in making history inclusive and learning about people who have been written about but rarely listened to. Some of the community-engaged collaborations have created space for these discussions, see: https://madnesscanada.com/ and www.eugenicsarchive.ca.This has extended to work focused on the COVID-19 pandemic with the COVID-19 Community Archive.Erika works to think about things in a global and interconnected way, bringing strong research and authentic passion to the topics she speaks on. Are you ready to think about the world in a different way? Join the discussion with Erika and me in this week's new episode. Get full access to Mind Body Health & Politics at www.mindbodyhealthpolitics.org/subscribe
It is always fascinating to hear an artist's tale. This one is no different. Our guest, Kevin Barron, is one of the world’s leading and prolific LSD blotter artists. His story is full of twists and turns, from working with the Rolling Stones to opening a cooking school in Greece, a federal sting operation, and the art he has created along the way.Kevin Barron experienced psychedelics for the first time at 17, and his perception of the world was changed forever. "As a budding artist, the whole experience was just this opening of perception. [He] was starting to look at things for the first time." While his initial careers were not in fine arts, he eventually found his way back to it. Through his journey Kevin worked for Island Records, basically discovered Cat Stevens, dabbled in the wine industry, and opened a cooking school in Greece; but it was in the late 80s when he found himself in San Francisco and returning to his artisan roots. Kevin was introduced to "Blotter Art", and immediately knew this was what he wanted to do. His first design known as the Holy Grail was met with huge success. Kevin then embarked on a widely successful, albeit tempestuous, career making LSD blotter art which ended in an arrest and lifetime ban from the U.S.A.Now Kevin is back creating new art and selling them as NFTs but in a new, revolutionary, way. Intrigued? Hear all about it in this week's new episode.
Conversations with old friends warm the soul. This week my heart is full as I found myself catching up with my dear friend Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld and reminiscing about his "firsts" with mind-altering substances. We go back 57 years to hear about his experiences and journey with these substances, and how they changed the course of his life. Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld is a psychiatrist, author, lecturer, and popular underground newspaper columnist. He got his medical degree at the University of Miami School of Medicine, interned at Herrick Memorial Hospital (Berkeley, CA), and got his Master of Public Health from Yale University. While he has made a name for himself in the field of Psychology, you might know him better as "Dr. Hip". Dr. Eugene Schoenfeld wrote the popular underground column "Ask Dr. Hip" where people could submit their questions about sexuality and drugs. The anti-censorship philosophy that inspired the awakening of an underground press in the 1960s allowed Schoenfeld the freedom to answer those forbidden questions. He quickly became a popular source of reliable, common-sense information. Schoenfeld published his column from 1967 to 1973 and again from 1978 to 1979 in the underground, as well as in various mainstream newspapers including the Chicago Sun Times, Tampa Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and the San Francisco Examiner. Schoenfeld was a pioneering radio personality on Bay Area stations in the 1970s, and subsequent talk show doctors credit him for being a trailblazer. I, myself, was deeply inspired by Eugene's work. He is quite famous, and quite well liked, in the Bay Area for bringing medical science to popular newspapers.A true pioneer in advocating for the benefits of mind-altering medicine, Dr. Schoenfeld (AKA Dr. Hip) gets personal about his experiences with LSD and how his life has been enhanced in this week's new episode.
In this week's episode, we bring you a thought-provoking discussion on the Psychedelic Renaissance. Our guest, historian and professor Erika Dyck, offers her perspective on where psychiatry and medical research intersect with psychedelic research. She also speaks about society's moral panic; what it means and what we should be doing about it. Erika is a Professor and a Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She was introduced to us by a previous guest, Paul Gootenberg, and we are so glad he made the introduction. With over 20 years of research under her belt, Erika is not only an expert on the history of psychedelic research but is also plugged into its future. She is the author or co-author of several books, including Psychedelic Psychiatry (2008); A Culture’s Catalyst: Historical Encounters with Peyote and the Native American Church in Canada (2016); Psychedelic Prophets: The Letters of Aldous Huxley and Humphry Osmond (2018); and co-author of The Acid Room: the Psychedelic Trials and Tribulations of Hollywood Hospital (2022). She is also the guest editor of the Chacruna Series on women in the history of psychedelic plant medicines. At the University of Saskatchewan, Erika teaches courses in the history of medicine and madness. She is particularly interested in making history inclusive and learning about people who have been written about but rarely listened to. Some of the community-engaged collaborations have created space for these discussions, see: https://madnesscanada.com/ and www.eugenicsarchive.ca.This has extended to work focused on the COVID-19 pandemic with the COVID-19 Community Archive.Erika works to think about things in a global and interconnected way, bringing strong research and authentic passion to the topics she speaks on. Are you ready to think about the world in a different way? Join the discussion with Erika and me in this week's new episode.
As a society, Americans are stressed out. Currently, we are facing perhaps the greatest uncertainty and stressors of our lifetime. Whenever we feel stressed out we suffer from not only anxiety and depression, but other health issues as well. Last week you heard cardiologist Dr. Christopher Davis, talking about the rise in heart conditions and the role stress has played. This week, in a very special extended episode, you will be hearing more about the root cause of many of our societal health problems – stress – from an expert on the subject. Over the years I’ve had the privilege of interviewing Dr. Gabor Maté several times on Mind Body Health & Politics. Dr. Maté is a bestselling author of four books published in over thirty language and an internationally renowned speaker highly sought after for his expertise on addiction, trauma, childhood development, and the relationship of stress and illness. His book on addiction, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, received the Hubert Evans Prize for literary non-fiction.Rather than offering quick-fix solutions to these complex issues, Dr. Maté weaves together scientific research, case histories, and his own insights and experience to present a broad perspective that enlightens and empowers people to promote their own healing and that of those around them. For his groundbreaking medical work and writing he has been awarded the Order of Canada, his country’s highest civilian distinction, and the Civic Merit Award from his hometown, Vancouver. He is also an expert on trauma, chemical dependence, and the broader topic of today’s program: stress and the mind-body connection.In the first part of this episode we look at stress and addiction, while the second part focuses on a less obvious manifestation of stress and disease- the proliferation of diagnoses of ADHD. Do we live in a toxic culture? Are we making ourselves sick? Dr. Gabor Maté answers these questions and more in this week's new episode.
Did you know that a staggering 80 percent of the U.S. population has either low or moderate cardiovascular health? That means just one in five people have a heart that’s in excellent shape, according to a new study by the American Heart Association. While these numbers are cause for concern, our guest this week is an Interventional Cardiologist and is here to tell you what you need to do to keep a healthy heart. In this episode, we welcomed Dr. Christopher Davis to the show. Dr. Davis practices Cardiology and Functional Medicine at Manatee Cardiovascular Wellness Institute and Reveal Vitality, where he is the founder and CEO. In his practice he incorporates nutrition, hormone balance, fitness, and permanent weight control. His board certifications are in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease, and interventional cardiology. Other specialties of practice include nutrition, fitness, and functional medicine. Dr. Davis has always been passionate about providing top-notch care and compassion to his clients. His achievements and training are a reflection of his pursuit of excellence in the treatment of chronic illnesses and performance enhancement. Dr. Davis trained at the prestigious Johns Hopkins/Sinai Hospital for his Internal Medicine residency. During his training, he was recognized and honored for his incredible talent and commitment to patient care by being bestowed the honor of Chief Medical Resident at Johns Hopkins/Sinai University. Dr. Davis continued his training in cardiology and interventional cardiology with fellowships at the renowned University of Virginia. He then pursued training in Functional Medicine, Bioidentical Hormone Replacement, and Regenerative Medicine to truly help his patients thrive and achieve reversal of disease and optimal vitality. This approach has earned Dr. Davis an outstanding reputation in the medical community and with his patients. Dr. Davis breaks down heart health and the need for a healthy lifestyle in a way that is both approachable and applicable to every day living. Learn all about it in this week's new episode.
This week I am pleased to welcome Dr. William Courtney back to the program along with his wife Kristen Courtney for a second part to their interview. Dr. Courtney's area of special interest is in the dietary uses of cannabis to which he considers as a conditionally essential nutrient in the diet of individuals of 40 years and older, and Kristen brings a decade of personal experience and research to the area of whole plant use for prevention and treatment.In research, Dr. Courtney has presented on high dose non-psychoactive dietary uses at Cannabis Therapeutics in Rhode Island (April 2010), the Institute of Molecular Psychiatry at the University of Bonn (June 2010), the Institute for Advanced Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (November 2010), and the International Cannabinoid Research Society conference in Chicago (July 2011). Kristen has presented her case study and research to the International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS), the International Cannabis As Medicine Society, in Bonn, Germany (on the Endocannabinoid System), in Israel at the Institute for Advanced Studies and the Israel Science Foundation, and at the International Cannabis As Medicine conference in Germany. She is heading up the experimental research design department in Ettelbruck, Luxembourg, working with the Association Luxembourgeoise des Methodes Preventives. Kristen is also reporting for Shaughnessy: The Journal of Cannabis In Clinical Practice.From personal experience stems Kristen's healing story is a powerful motivator. She has used fresh cannabis leaf to put her Systemic Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Endometriosis, and numerous other conditions into a sustained remission. With 14 surgeries and 4 years of bed rest she has empathy as well as knowledge that has arisen from her education in statistics and research design, which helps her bridge the gap between patients, physicians, and researchers.Dr. Courtney and Kristen co-founded Cannabis International, which is working to reverse the United Nation’s Convention One Treaty in order to allow people access to cannabis worldwide, and currently reside in the Commonwealth of Dominica, where they run the Nature Isle Sanctuary- offering consultations with individuals suffering from Endogenous Cannabinoid System deficiencies. Want to learn more about what they do? Check out their video on juicing raw cannabis.
Paul is a professor of history and sociology at Stony Brook University (New York). Originally trained as an interdisciplinary Latin Americanist at Oxford University and the University of Chicago, his career now mostly focuses on drug and global commodity history.Outside of the university, Paul has chaired various programs at the Social Science Research Council in Brooklyn including the Drugs, Security, and Democracy program; and is the General Editor for The Oxford Handbook of Global Drug History (recently published by Oxford University Press). He currently is the president of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society (2021-2023).He has published three books on cocaine; Andean Cocaine: The Making of a Global Drug (UNC, 2008), Cocaine: Global Histories (Routledge, 1999), and with Liliana M. Dávalos, The Origins of Cocaine: Peasant Colonization and Failed Dedevelopment in the Amazon Andes (Routledge, 2018).
This week I am pleased to welcome renowned musician Gary Muszysnki to the program.Gary Muszynski is a percussionist, composer, bandleader, and leadership coach who creates original music that combines jazz, world, and classical music. He plays a wide variety of world percussion, including handpan, berimbau, pandeiro, surdo, udu, mbira, conga, bongo, and cajon. He has performed at venues such as SF Jazz (with Bobby McFerrin), the Freight and Salvage in Berkeley, CA, the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville and at TEDxBerkeley. Gary received an artist’s grant to study Brazilian folkloric and popular music at the Carlos Gomez Conservatory in Belem, Para (Brazil) at the mouth of the Amazon through the Partners of the Americas in 1989. It was at that time that he also met Martinho da Villa, one of Brazil's most important samba singers and composers, and began to study and parade with the Vila Isabel School of Samba in Rio de Janeiro, and then with Olodum in Salvador, Bahia in 2005.Gary was one of the first percussionists to spread samba in the US, founding a samba school in the Midwest in 1987. He founded One World Music at that time, a non-profit performing arts and education organization, receiving funding from the Missouri Arts Council and the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission.Currently residing in the SF Bay Area; Gary’s newest album is called Roots and Wings, featuring Sting’s pianist and arranger Frank Martin; Mark Summer, the former cellist and co-founder of the Turtle Island Quartet; Cuban jazz-piano legend, Omar Sosa, and Deepak Ram, North Indian bansuri flute master as well as many other musical luminaries. Roots & Wings won the top award at the Global Music Awards in 2021 and was then voted as one of the best CDs of 2021.In addition to his career as a recording and performing artists, Gary has been brining musical experiences and thinking into organizations to further leadership, collaboration, and innovation for the past 30 years. He has reached more than 150,000 leaders and managers through organizational trainings and interactive conference keynotes on five continents and has worked with Apple, Disney, Google, and Xerox Parc among many other organizations. You can see his work through Orchestrating Excellence here.
With training from the Harvard Mind/Body Medical Institute and over 25 years of clinical mental health and mind/body expertise, Heather Lee is truly passionate about guiding people into connection with their inner wisdom to promote health, healing, and hopefulness. In addition to being certified in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy and skilled as a behavior change specialist, she is the past Director of Wellness Education at The University of Virginia Medical Center, is on the advisory board of Silo Wellness, and runs her company Medicine Women Retreats.As a psychedelic psychotherapist, speaker, consultant, and transformational travel facilitator, Heather has dedicated her career to helping people learn how to skillfully navigate stress, anxiety, challenging life transitions, and relationships. One of Heather’s many areas of expertise is woman’s health, and her Medicine Woman Retreats are the first psilocybin retreats designed exclusively for women; offering exclusive nature immersion and plant medicine experiences around the world. Other signature topics are psychedelics for self-care, psilocybin for eco-anxiety, and psilocybin in cancer care- something she has first-hand experience with. In the same week, Heather received her certification as a psychedelic-assisted psychotherapist, received a diagnosis of breast cancer, and received a call from Silo Wellness to help develop cancer and end of life retreats. In Heather’s own words, “sometimes the alignment and synchronicity of everything shines so bright.” As if the universe came together, she sees her cancer as an opportunity to deepen her connection with the use of psilocybin for navigating disease. Heather uses her experience as a psychotherapist as well as her journey to cultivate calm and consciousness for one’s cancer journey. Our first featured guest in the series “Healing Stories of Psychedelics”, Heather A. Lee is both a healer and finding healing.
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