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This is part 2 of a 3-part interview with Jay Salinas; Brenda Baker, as well as Jacque and Dan Enge.  These guests bring robust backgrounds and life experiences to the various aspects of a unique Sauk County event: The Farm/Art D'Tour. This nationally renowned event gives visitors and residents an opportunity to tour Sauk County and the myriad of ways that (as Max Garland wrote) "Art amplifies what landscape quietly asserts". IF you choose to avail yourself of this exquisite journey you will find Art that is beautifully integrated into its surroundings in "Farm Forms" as well as "Pasture Performances" filled with music, merriment and mirth and (as if that wasn’t enough) fermented culinary treats at area "Food Chain" marketplaces filled with food, art and ideas.  Jay Salinas is the Director of Special Projects & Outreach at the Wormfarm Institute which coordinates the Farm/Art DTour.  Jay is an artist, farmer and co-founder of Wormfarm. He coordinates the Artist Residency program, and leads food and agriculture outreach initiatives. He helped conceptualize the Farm/Art DTour and has served as juror, logistics and Food Chain coordinator from 2011-2020. Trained as a sculptor, Jay holds a BFA from University of IL Champaign and an MFA from University of Cincinnati. He has operated a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm since 1995. He has worked nationally for food justice and sustainability issues and was a director at Growing Power in Milwaukee from 2006-09.Brenda Baker is an artist, writer, and museum curator, whose work intersects the fields of ecological restoration, sustainable design, cultural geography and site-specific sculpture. Brenda has an MFA from University of Wisconsin-Madison, a BA from DePauw University, and studied at both the Austro-American Institute in Vienna, Austria and Karl Marx University of Economics in Budapest, Hungary. Brenda is the Vice President of Exhibits, Facilities and Strategic Initiativesfor Madison Children’s Museum in Madison, WI, where she has worked for the past three decades, leading the museum’s nationally known exhibition and sustainability efforts.  Her artwork is inspired by both children and the natural world, and has been shown throughout the world and held in collections in Europe, Canada, South America and the United States. She has participated in three previous Art Farm D’Tours, and is working on a piece for this year’s D’Tour called the CarbonEra Café with arist Beth Persche and the Wormfarm Institute. She has been named a Noyce Fellow, a Badger Bioneer and Sustainabiltiy Visionary of the Year, and the children’s museum has received the highest honor for museums in the United States, the National Medal, for its national leadership in community engagement and sustainability. Jacque & Dan Enge are co-founders of Veggie Emporium which is located in Sauk County, WI. Veggie Emporium started as a quaint roadside stand and has since expanded to sell at the Baraboo Farmers' Market. Their focus is providing nutrient rich produce to the community while promoting biodiversity and soil regeneration. 
This is part 1 of a 3-part interview with Jay Salinas; Brenda Baker, as well as Jacque and Dan Enge.  These guests bring robust backgrounds and life experiences to the various aspects of a unique Sauk County event: The Farm/Art D'Tour. This nationally renowned event gives visitors and residents an opportunity to tour Sauk County and the myriad of ways that (as Max Garland wrote) "Art amplifies what landscape quietly asserts". IF you choose to avail yourself of this exquisite journey you will find Art that is beautifully integrated into its surroundings in "Farm Forms" as well as "Pasture Performances" filled with music, merriment and mirth and (as if that wasn’t enough) fermented culinary treats at area "Food Chain" marketplaces filled with food, art and ideas.  Jay Salinas is the Director of Special Projects & Outreach at the Wormfarm Institute which coordinates the Farm/Art DTour.  Jay is an artist, farmer and co-founder of Wormfarm. He coordinates the Artist Residency program, and leads food and agriculture outreach initiatives. He helped conceptualize the Farm/Art DTour and has served as juror, logistics and Food Chain coordinator from 2011-2020. Trained as a sculptor, Jay holds a BFA from University of IL Champaign and an MFA from University of Cincinnati. He has operated a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm since 1995. He has worked nationally for food justice and sustainability issues and was a director at Growing Power in Milwaukee from 2006-09.Brenda Baker is an artist, writer, and museum curator, whose work intersects the fields of ecological restoration, sustainable design, cultural geography and site-specific sculpture. Brenda has an MFA from University of Wisconsin-Madison, a BA from DePauw University, and studied at both the Austro-American Institute in Vienna, Austria and Karl Marx University of Economics in Budapest, Hungary. Brenda is the Vice President of Exhibits, Facilities and Strategic Initiativesfor Madison Children’s Museum in Madison, WI, where she has worked for the past three decades, leading the museum’s nationally known exhibition and sustainability efforts.  Her artwork is inspired by both children and the natural world, and has been shown throughout the world and held in collections in Europe, Canada, South America and the United States. She has participated in three previous Art Farm D’Tours, and is working on a piece for this year’s D’Tour called the CarbonEra Café with arist Beth Persche and the Wormfarm Institute. She has been named a Noyce Fellow, a Badger Bioneer and Sustainabiltiy Visionary of the Year, and the children’s museum has received the highest honor for museums in the United States, the National Medal, for its national leadership in community engagement and sustainability. Jacque & Dan Enge are co-founders of Veggie Emporium which is located in Sauk County, WI. Veggie Emporium started as a quaint roadside stand and has since expanded to sell at the Baraboo Farmers' Market. Their focus is providing nutrient rich produce to the community while promoting biodiversity and soil regeneration. 
Tom Eggert is one of those individuals who's zest for life and blazing optimism infects those around him (like me) with a deep sense of hope.  As George Bernard Shaw once wrote he "dreams dreams of things that never were, and asks why not?"  His career has been one filled with some pretty major twists and turns, but in looking back, it always seemed like each step was the perfect preparation for the next one.  He has been a proverbial Pooh Bear that has allowed the river to take him where it will.  Now in retirement, he gives me the impression of a kid in a candy store that's been presented with so many great options, that it's really hard to make just one selection. Tom has been at the forefront of business and sustainability for the last twenty-five years, both teaching classes in sustainability at the University of Wisconsin and founding and serving as the Executive Director of the WI Sustainable Business Council. Tom taught the first classes on campus in sustainability and later was a co-developer of the graduate certificate in Business, Environment and Social Responsibility (BESR) at the WI School of Business. He has written and spoken extensively on the changing role of business in society, corporate social responsibility, socially responsible investing, divestment, and on how the private sector can lead in responding to generational challenges such as climate change. Growing out of his interest in sustainability, Tom founded the non-profit “Wisconsin Microfinance”. Wisconsin Microfinance’s programs provide people living in areas where access to capital is severely limited ACCESS to financial and support services needed to lift their families out of poverty.
Say hello to Kyle Crosby.  With all the issues going on with teens today like gender fluidity, suicide rates, and bullying, we all need someone that can help us navigate these increasingly complex times. Kyle's the guy I turn to when I'm trying to really understand the issues that Today's Teens face each and every day.  Kyle Crosby returns to talk turkey and help me (and you) understand the pressures and problems of being a Teenager in today's world.  He's a great resource for our community and the kind of person you want running programs for them.  Hope you can listen in and gain a greater understanding of all those people facing adulthood in a compassionate frame of reference.Kyle Crosby serves as the Director of Operations for the Boys & Girls Clubs of West-Central Wisconsin; a group of small, rural clubs located in Baraboo, Reedsburg and Tomah.  A Sauk Prairie native, Kyle graduated from UW-LaCrosse with a BS in Sports Management.  After graduation, he Spent 3 years in Appleton, WI in the sports world before moving back closer to home to start a family with his wife, Sam.  As an advocate for youth already (with experience in coaching hockey and baseball) the opportunity to serve our central Wisconsin's youth at a larger level at the Boys & Girls Club fell into Kyle’s lap in 2014.  He hasn’t looked back since and has grown into a leader within the organization and multiple communities.
He's the guy I turn to when I'm trying to really understand the issues that Today's Teens face each and every day.  Kyle Crosby returns to talk turkey and help me (and you) understand the pressures and problems of being a Teenager in today's world.  He's a great resource for our community and the kind of person you want running programs for them.  Hope you can listen in and gain a greater understanding of all those people facing adulthood in a compassionate frame of reference.Kyle Crosby serves as the Director of Operations for the Boys & Girls Clubs of West-Central Wisconsin; a group of small, rural clubs located in Baraboo, Reedsburg and Tomah.  A Sauk Prairie native, Kyle graduated from UW-LaCrosse with a BS in Sports Management.  After graduation, he Spent 3 years in Appleton, WI in the sports world before moving back closer to home to start a family with his wife, Sam.  As an advocate for youth already (with experience in coaching hockey and baseball) the opportunity to serve our central Wisconsin's youth at a larger level at the Boys & Girls Club fell into Kyle’s lap in 2014.  He hasn’t looked back since and has grown into a leader within the organization and multiple communities.
If you want to get a super charge of hope and faith in something bigger than yourself, sit down and talk with Antowan Hallmon for an hour or so (Even just 20 minutes if you're rushed for time).  He is sincerely one of the kindest and most gracious people I have ever met.  He is also genuinely interested in knowing peplfinding ways to care for them and meeting their needs whenever possible.  He also just happens to be a Christian Pastor of the Faithworks ministries in Baraboo Wisconsin.  Faithworks is a 100% virtual, non-denominational church and if you listen to our conversation, you'll find out what that means and how a kid that grew up in taverns ended up becoming an on-fire minister.  A minister that tries to just get people to focus on Jesus Christ and getting to know Him, then getting out of the way of Christ's work in those people.  It's not about church, it's about a person and getting to know Him.Antowan J. Hallmon Sr is the Founder and Senior Pastor of FaithWorks Ministries (FWM) in Baraboo, WI.  Pastor Antowan was born in Chicago, IL.  He grew up between Chicago, IL, Lakeland, FL, and Madison, WI.    Pastor Antowan has 25+ years of restaurant/service industry experience and has managed restaurants across the country in Boston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Madison, WI.In 2008 Pastor Antowan gave his life to Jesus Christ after a life changing accident, and in 2011 dedicated his life to ministry.  He learned ministry and God granted him tremendous spiritual growth under the spiritual leadership of his spiritual father Pastor Matt Fearson at Hope Through Christ Ministries. If you want to check out Pastor Hallmon's Sunday services you can find the live link for Sunday morning's at 10am here: Calendar - FaithWorks Ministries (fwministries.com)
If you want to get a super charge of hope and faith in something bigger than yourself, sit down and talk with Antowan Hallmon for an hour or so (Even just 20 minutes if you're rushed for time).  He is sincerely one of the kindest and most gracious people I have ever met.  He is also genuinely interested in knowing peplfinding ways to care for them and meeting their needs whenever possible.  He also just happens to be a Christian Pastor of the Faithworks ministries in Baraboo Wisconsin.  Faithworks is a 100% virtual, non-denominational church and if you listen to our conversation, you'll find out what that means and how a kid that grew up in taverns ended up becoming an on-fire minister.  A minister that tries to just get people to focus on Jesus Christ and getting to know Him, then getting out of the way of Christ's work in those people.  It's not about church, it's about a person and getting to know Him.Antowan J. Hallmon Sr is the Founder and Senior Pastor of FaithWorks Ministries (FWM) in Baraboo, WI.  Pastor Antowan was born in Chicago, IL.  He grew up between Chicago, IL, Lakeland, FL, and Madison, WI.    Pastor Antowan has 25+ years of restaurant/service industry experience and has managed restaurants across the country in Boston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Madison, WI.In 2008 Pastor Antowan gave his life to Jesus Christ after a life changing accident, and in 2011 dedicated his life to ministry.  He learned ministry and God granted him tremendous spiritual growth under the spiritual leadership of his spiritual father Pastor Matt Fearson at Hope Through Christ Ministries. If you want to check out Pastor Hallmon's Sunday services you can find the live link for Sunday morning's at 10am here: Calendar - FaithWorks Ministries (fwministries.com)
Last week I finished up the podcast with a reference to Simon Sinek’s book “Leaders Eat Last”.  This week I’m going back to Mr. Sinek again because Morgan’s philosophy about leadership training as well as his methods for teaching of it are very much in alignment with the teachings of Sinek.  One of Sinek’s earliest revelations in leadership training was to “start out with why”.  He had observed in his research of organizations that everyone in an organization knows what it is that they do and some even know how to do it, but very few know WHY they do it.  It’s not just “to make a profit” because that’s a result, and it will always be JUST a result of providing something of value.  Why means: What’s your purpose?  What’s your cause?  Why does your organization exist?  Why do you get out of the bed in the morning and why should anyone care?   The fact that most of us don’t know our individual “Whys” may be the main reason for the “Great Resignation”.  for many of us, the Pandemic forced a re-evaluation of that question and we came up lacking.Sinek’s advice and in fact what makes the SCIL training so different (especially the way Morgan teaches it) is that it starts with the premise that EVERYONE can be a leader but they have to Establish clear personal, family, and health goals. These are your "WHY" goals.  Why do you do what you do?  If you don’t know . . it’s time to find out, don’t you think?  And remember too that communication isn’t about speaking, it’s about listening.  The rewards from getting that right, are exceptional.Morgan McArthur’s career path has been winding, unconventional and rewarding.  He has practiced as a large animal veterinarian in Idaho, mending cattle and horses for 15 years.  Was Research & Development Manager at a New Zealand pharmaceutical company for a decade. As if that wasn't enough he has also given keynote/motivational speeches to audiences as small as three people to three thousand and has found a creative niche as a lettering/pinstriping artist.   SCIL is one way in which he has enjoyed giving back to his home county as a UW-Madison Extension educator for five years. Morgan is a co-facilitator in the Sauk County Institute of Leadership (SCIL) program, where participants learn more about themselves, learn a lot about the county and learn leadership skills. He’s also very involved with public art in his hometown of Baraboo. At this stage of his career Morgan knows it’s important to give back to the community and he brings enthusiasm to that mission.
There’s a book by the name of “Leaders Eat Last” by Simon Sinek that I need to finish.  In it Mr. Sinek identifies some key principles that I think underscore what Morgan and I have been talking about this week, and will continue to probe next week.  Leaders Eat Last makes the following assertion:"The true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own"According to many experts in the study of historical and modern day leadership personalities and styles, they have found that a great leader always tries to see things from other people’s perspective.  They listen.  They are compassionate and empathetic when appropriate, as well as directive and decisive as each situational AND INDIVIDUAL constellation of events unfolds.  Leadership is not a “one size fits all”.  It's more like the jacket the Michael J. Fox puts on in Back to the Future Part 2.  Remember how he initially puts it on and it looks like he’s swimming in it? and then, it adjusts itself to his body measurements as he stands there.  I think of leadership this way. You have to put it on and take the time to let the role “fit” you.  It’s less about skills that are learned, and more about the character traits and emotional intelligence that each of us needs to develop through making mistakes, owning them and working to get better with each day.  We’ve got to look under our “hoods” to understand how our engines work and where they NEED work.Morgan McArthur’s career path has been winding, unconventional and rewarding.  He has practiced as a large animal veterinarian in Idaho, mending cattle and horses for 15 years.  Was Research & Development Manager at a New Zealand pharmaceutical company for a decade. As if that wasn't enough he has also given keynote/motivational speeches to audiences as small as three people to three thousand and has found a creative niche as a lettering/pinstriping artist.   SCIL is one way in which he has enjoyed giving back to his home county as a UW-Madison Extension educator for five years. Morgan is a co-facilitator in the Sauk County Institute of Leadership (SCIL) program, where participants learn more about themselves, learn a lot about the county and learn leadership skills. He’s also very involved with public art in his hometown of Baraboo. At this stage of his career Morgan knows it’s important to give back to the community and he brings enthusiasm to that mission.
There’s a line in Stephen Sondheim’s musical “Sunday in the Park with George” where two characters are critiquing a work of art and one sings “Work is what you do for other people, Art is what you do for yourself”.  I USED to think that sounded very self absorbed and snooty, but I’ve come to realize in the past few years that it’s really not.  It’s a comment about art’s ability to provide self protection, self regeneration, self preservation.  From my perspective, as a LIFELONG advocate and practitioner of Arts, I have to ask what will it take for the majority of us to figure out how art can heal us?…Haven’t we had our fill of ugly, angry hateful dialog between opposing political parties?  Reprehensible violence in our schools and even now, Grocery stores.  news casts and podcasts and social media posts that focus less on information and more on inflammation. our lack of common ground has us more polarized than we have been since the civil war.  How long before we all insist that something needs to change in how we behave?  People use Europe and Canada as examples of places laws have curbed much of the violence that we regularly experience. BUT isn’t it interesting that in both Europe and Canada, they ALSO pay much more attention to the Arts in their schools and in their daily LIVES?  They spend much more money, time, and energy on educating people’s HEARTS as well as their minds.  They know that there is extensive therapeutic value in learning to appreciate and tap into our individual and collective creativity.  They understand that like the words of the old hymn “Bless be the Ties that bind” art is one of those ties that bind us together.  Arts bring people together. Like Lindsey's example of the Big Top Chautauqua.  Republicans, Democrats, the old and the young all attending, responding and enjoying the same event. All together without fighting. Hmmmm, what if we had more of that in our lives? 
Art – the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.  As I read that definition of today’s subject matter I am perplexed by two questions: Given that Art allows us to express or apply something that is so uniquely human - why isn't everyone encouraged to explore their individual creativity?  I mean, isn't that as important as 2 + 2?Given that Art produces works of beauty and/or emotional power - shouldn't we be more careful about who uses it and for what purpose?I look around at the myriad of Art mediums and the content expressed and at times I just feel overwhelmed.  Mainly because I see so much irresponsibility in the way the "vocabulary" of Art is used by folks that use it to accomplish an agenda that pits us against one another instead of uniting us. But that's because I'm an idealist and want Art to be used for its higher purposes of liberation and inspiration of our souls instead of as a tool to manipulate and influence our base instincts. Area residents may know Lindsey Giese as the Executive Director of River Arts Inc, a non-profit arts organization in Prairie du Sac, but prior to this role, she was the lead singer for Holland America and Celebrity Cruises.She holds 2 Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Music Theatre and Arts Administration and currently tours the Midwest with The Dang-Its in a review show entitled “Sweet Dreams and Honky Tonks.”She is also a board member for the Sauk Prairie Area Chamber of Commerce and Friends of the Great Sauk State Trail.
I think the thing I enjoy so much about my conversations with Cathy is her hopefulness.  She is not one to talk about her own past traumas, but she has shared some of it with me over the years and I can assure you that her life story is one that would make most people very pessimistic and withdrawn.  Instead, her faith and her compassion for others has led her out of a very dark place into one where helping others is not only possible, but in her mind critical to her own healing.I think she’s doing something very simple and incredibly difficult at the same time.  She’s living what she believes. Her faith that there is a reason for the traumas that she has endured and that God has used them to make her stronger and more able to help people that desperately need a life line.  Her story is one of perseverance. her message is one of healing.  I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty sure today’s world could use a lot more Cathys.Cathy Lins worked as a consultant for many years by assisting numerous not-for-profit organizations to raise money to do work in communities with desperate needs.  She has also given speeches and conducted workshops around the country specializing in fundraising techniques as well as help trauma survivors recover.  Her current full-time project is Gather My Lost Sheep, which focuses on helping trauma survivors return to Catholic parishes and to restore their faith in Christ.  She did this as a result of realizing that Priests aren't always trained in this and aren't sure what to do.  In addition, stigma keeps the laity from talking about mental health issues. This results in Impacted families feeling isolated.  Cathy became convinced that this isn't who the Church is meant to be.   Gather My Lost Sheep strives to teach people to ask "How do I accompany someone who is hurting? How can I be Christ to them?"Over 70% of the population has experienced trauma. The events and isolation in 2020 have simply added to the strain on our mental health. Cathy decided to rethink evangelization and pastoral care when she saw the impact on people living with trauma and their mass exodus from the Church. As a national speaker working with US bishops and priests, she has talked about leadership in the Church at the parish and diocesan level.  She brings technical knowledge and lived experience to this conversation.
Trauma is such an ugly word.  it immediately conjures up thoughts horrible, life changing events.  Catastrophes that fall upon us without warning.  situations that are complex, emotional, and stressful.  And then there’s all the recovery and healing that adds to the ongoing impact and difficulty.  We endure the trauma and its aftermath and either grow bitter because it just doesn’t make sense to us or seems unjust, or we use it strengthen us in wisdom and compassion.What I find fascinating about Cathy’s work, is that she finds as she conducts workshops that a rapidly increasing number of attendants report that they realize after Cathy’s workshops that they see evidence of trauma in their own lives.  And they’re surprised by how it has been impacting them and their behavior without any awareness.Cathy Lins worked as a consultant for many years by assisting numerous not-for-profit organizations to raise money to do work in communities with desperate needs.  She has also given speeches and conducted workshops around the country specializing in fundraising techniques as well as help trauma survivors recover.  Her current full-time project is Gather My Lost Sheep, which focuses on helping trauma survivors return to Catholic parishes and to restore their faith in Christ.  She did this as a result of realizing that Priests aren't always trained in this and aren't sure what to do.  In addition, stigma keeps the laity from talking about mental health issues. This results in Impacted families feeling isolated.  Cathy became convinced that this isn't who the Church is meant to be.   Gather My Lost Sheep strives to teach people to ask "How do I accompany someone who is hurting? How can I be Christ to them?"Over 70% of the population has experienced trauma. The events and isolation in 2020 have simply added to the strain on our mental health. Cathy decided to rethink evangelization and pastoral care when she saw the impact on people living with trauma and their mass exodus from the Church. As a national speaker working with US bishops and priests, she has talked about leadership in the Church at the parish and diocesan level. She brings technical knowledge and lived experience to this conversation.
Part 2 of my interview with Jeff WrightJeff Wright is someone that I've known for almost 10 years and he happens to be one of those people that, as I've gotten to know him I've learned to not only like him more but also to respect him more.  That respect is based in the job that he does and the way he does it.  Being in the field of Education is no cake walk these days.  Jeff though is able to not only deal with the logistics and political aspects of his job, but he also has never lost his core love and empathy for the families he serves.  He instills HOPE in people who associate with him and his Why Not attitude is down right infectious.  Listen to our conversation for yourself and see how it changes your Frame of Reference about the job today's educators have to do.Jeff Wright is the superintendent of the Sauk Prairie School District.  His family lives on a farm near Plain where they enjoy raising chickens and being outdoors all year round.  Before joining the team in Sauk Prairie in 2012, Jeff served as a high school principal in Chicago and was a Social Studies teacher in Rochester, Minnesota.  Jeff grew up in Stevens Point, Wisconsin and has degrees from St. Olaf College and Harvard University. 
Jeff Wright is someone that I've known for almost 10 years and he happens to be one of those people that, as I've gotten to know him I've learned to not only like him more but also to respect him more.  That respect is based in the job that he does and the way he does it.  Being in the field of Education is no cake walk these days.  Jeff though is able to not only deal with the logistics and political aspects of his job, but he also has never lost his core love and empathy for the families he serves.  He instills HOPE in people who associate with him and his Why Not attitude is down right infectious.  Listen to our conversation for yourself and see how it changes your Frame of Reference about the job today's educators have to do.Jeff Wright is the superintendent of the Sauk Prairie School District.  His family lives on a farm near Plain where they enjoy raising chickens and being outdoors all year round.  Before joining the team in Sauk Prairie in 2012, Jeff served as a high school principal in Chicago and was a Social Studies teacher in Rochester, Minnesota.  Jeff grew up in Stevens Point, Wisconsin and has degrees from St. Olaf College and Harvard University. 
Part two of my interview with John Lehan, Community Education and Recreation Director for the Sauk Prairie Community Center.  John returns to "Frame of Reference" to once again remind us of all the ways that we can pause and celebrate life by just relaxing and recreating.  Recreation is one of those words that can seem super serious or somewhat frivolous depending upon your perspective.  It comes from a late Middle English word which had the connotation of something that provided ‘mental or spiritual consolation’ which in turn came from  an Old French word recreare  meaning to ‘create again, renew'.  Well given the current state of national and global affairs . . . who couldn't use some of that?  But at the end of the day, recreation isn't so much about what we do, as it is about HOW we do it and WHY.  So I caught up with an expert in our area that understands Recreation from just about every vantage point that exists.John Lehan serves as the Community Education and Recreation Director for the Sauk Prairie Community Center. He has served the Sauk Prairie community since November of 2012.  John, his wife Lisa and daughter Azilynn live in the Sauk Prairie community. Family hobbies include board games, visiting local and state parks, bowling, and Mickey Mouse. John also serves as Vice President with the Friends of Sauk Prairie Parks and Recreation group which is developing Culver Community Park.  
John Lehan returns to "Frame of Reference" to once again remind us of all the ways that we can pause and celebrate life by just relaxing and recreating.  Recreation is one of those words that can seem super serious or somewhat frivolous depending upon your perspective.  It comes from a late Middle English word which had the connotation of something that provided ‘mental or spiritual consolation’ which in turn came from  an Old French word recreare  meaning to ‘create again, renew'.  Well given the current state of national and global affairs . . . who couldn't use some of that?  But at the end of the day, recreation isn't so much about what we do, as it is about HOW we do it and WHY.  So I caught up with an expert in our area that understands Recreation from just about every vantage point that exists.John Lehan serves as the Community Education and Recreation Director for the Sauk Prairie Community Center. He has served the Sauk Prairie community since November of 2012.  John, his wife Lisa and daughter Azilynn live in the Sauk Prairie community. Family hobbies include board games, visiting local and state parks, bowling, and Mickey Mouse. John also serves as Vice President with the Friends of Sauk Prairie Parks and Recreation group which is developing Culver Community Park.  
Ok, I admit that I'm being a bit more flamboyant with the name of this week's episode, but that's because my guest for this week and next really stirred in me  a desire to wax poetic.  Curt Meine and I have known each other for a long time but I don't think we've ever had an opportunity to have a conversation that was this long.  Listen closely and you too will get to know him better in this second part of a two episode conversation with him.  Hopefully you will see (or at least hear) how his deep love for humanity and our home drives him more and more to bend the ear of anyone that will listen to his warnings and pleas for more responsible behavior with regards to conservation and preservation. Don't write him off as a "tree hugger".  He is a true scientist with the heart of a poet, and he "knows his stuff".  He never demands that people agree with him, he only asks that you consider the data that is being collected all around the world.  There is no agenda, just a desire to understand and make better decisions based upon our current understanding.Curt Meine is a conservation biologist, environmental historian, and writer.  He serves as Senior Fellow with the Aldo Leopold Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin, and with the Chicago-based Center for Humans and Nature.  He is also a Research Associate with the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo and Associate Adjunct Professor in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology.Over the years Meine has worked with a wide array of non-profit organizations, agencies, universities, and businesses, including the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Wildlife Fund, and the American Museum of Natural History.  He has served on the Board of Governors of the Society of Conservation Biology and on the editorial boards of the journals Conservation Biology and Environmental Ethics.  He also served as Director of Conservation Programs for the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters.  In this capacity Meine oversaw the Academy’s “Waters of Wisconsin” initiative, a comprehensive, state-wide review of the status and needs of Wisconsin’s aquatic ecosystems and resources.In addition to his Leopold biography, Meine has written and edited a number of books on conservation and environmental history, including Wallace Stegner and the Continental Vision (1998), The Essential Aldo Leopold: Quotations and Commentaries (1999), Correction Lines: Essays on Land, Leopold, and Conservation (2004); the Library of America collection Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac and Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (2013); and the bioregional anthology The Driftless Reader (2017).  Meine also served as narrator and on-screen guide for the Emmy Award-winning documentary film Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time (2011), which continues to be screened in venues around the country and has appeared more than 1,000 times on PBS stations.
Ok, I admit that I'm being a bit more artsy with this week's episode, but that's because my guest for this week and next really stirred in me  a desire to wax poetic.  Curt Meine and I have known each other for a long time but I don't think we've ever had a chance to have a conversation that was this long.  You will get to know him better in the next two weeks and hopefully you will see how his deep love for humanity and our home drives him more and more to bend the ear of anyone that will listen to his warnings and pleas for more responsible behavior with regards to conservation and preservation. Don't write him off as a "tree hugger".  He is a true scientist with the heart of a poet, and he "knows his stuff".  He never demands that people agree with him, he only asks that you consider the data that is being collected all around the world.  There is no agenda, just a desire to understand and make better decisions based upon our current understanding.Curt Meine is a conservation biologist, environmental historian, and writer based in Sauk County, Wisconsin.  He serves as Senior Fellow with the Aldo Leopold Foundation and Center for Humans and Nature; as Research Associate with the International Crane Foundation; and as Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Over the last three decades he has worked with a wide array of organizations at the intersection of biodiversity conservation, agriculture, water, climate change, environmental justice, and community resilience.  Meine has authored and edited several books, including the award-winning biography Aldo Leopold:  His Life and Work (1988/2010) and The Driftless Reader (2017).  He served as on-screen guide in the Emmy Award-winning documentary film Green Fire:  Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time (2011).  In his home landscape, he is a founding member of the Sauk Prairie Conservation Alliance.
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