DiscoverIJNotes: An IJNet podcastEnvironmental Journalism, Part 5: Reporting on environmental crime
Environmental Journalism, Part 5: Reporting on environmental crime

Environmental Journalism, Part 5: Reporting on environmental crime

Update: 2022-08-10
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Environmental crime, also known as eco-crime, is any form of illegal activity — organized or otherwise — that has a direct and negative effect on the natural world. From illegal deforestation in the Amazon, to unregulated overfishing in the Indo-Pacific, to water, air and soil pollution caused by illegal gold mines, environmental crime doesn’t just harm the environment, it also often has devastating consequences for local communities who rely on healthy ecosystems for their livelihoods.

Reporting on environmental crime can take years, combining on-the-ground investigative reporting techniques with data journalism, geo-mapping, and combing of government records. Journalists on this beat are required to not only be skilled investigative reporters, but also adept communicators who can explain why these crimes should matter to the average reader.

For more about what it takes to report on environmental crime, we spoke with Fiona Macleod, founder and director of the Oxpeckers Center for Investigative Environmental Journalism, Africa’s first investigative outlet covering environmental crime. In our podcast, Macleod discusses why she founded Oxpeckers and the impact of its multi-year investigations, while offering advice for journalists interested in reporting on environmental crime.

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Environmental Journalism, Part 5: Reporting on environmental crime

Environmental Journalism, Part 5: Reporting on environmental crime

IJNet