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In this episode, we demystify Leadership and Management: we delve into what sets them apart; typify the different styles; explore values systems, including our own and share our core beliefs. As always, we go below the surface and deep dive into this topic, at a time when it matters more than ever. This episode, on the topic of leadership and management, will be concluded by episode 32. Navigation: Intro (01:34) Section 1: Definition (01:58) Section 2: Typifying Leaders (06:34) Conclusion (38:56) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Entrepreneur in Residence at Red River West, co-founder of App Annie / Data.ai, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Nuno Welcome to our Episode 31, the first of two episodes on leadership and management. Bertrand and I will demystify leadership and management, define the difference between both, typify them, explore value systems, and also share our own core beliefs. As always, no BS. We will go below the surface and deep dive into this topic. Section 1 - Definition Nuno From the ground up let's start with the actual definition of this and a bit of a caveat emptor. Buyer be aware, as they call it. Obviously we will share what we think are great practices of leadership and management, but by no means these are the only practices, and by no means we aim to be professorial about it. Secondly, most importantly, probably by sharing our own views, we're not saying that we are amazing leaders or managers. Obviously, that's not for us to judge, but for people that have worked with us, for us, with us along the years. So that is not the assumption. Obviously, there is some assumption that we have something to say about this topic, otherwise you wouldn't be listening. But we don't aim to be arrogant enough to say that. Maybe starting with the definition of leadership versus management, and this comes from someone I used to work with, a very good friend, but also someone I worked with for a very long period of time in two different roles. The way she would qualify the difference between leadership and management is, if the objective function is to get to hell, a leader is the person that can convey to people with amazing charisma and presence that we're going to go to hell and hopefully we'll come back for sure, hopefully we'll come back, etc. The leader will likely not define necessarily very much how one will get to hell and back, but they will convince people to go with them, certainly the first time around. A great manager might lack the charisma, but the great manager will define the steps to get to hell and back, will be clear about what needs to be done to get to hell and back. They might have difficulty in convincing people to go to hell in that first time, but it will be easier for them to convince them to go or try to go to hell a second or third time, even if they fail the first time, because they have a clearer view of the process to get there. So again, a leader normally, in my opinion, a little bit more linked to... In some ways great aspects of charisma and management is basically linked to great aspects of understanding steps that need to be done and things that need to be done. A great manager might not be a great leader. A great leader might not be a great manager. There are very few great leaders that are great managers. So that's maybe a little bit more flesh around the definition. Bertrand, do you agree with that definition? Bertrand That definition would be fit for Churchill, for instance, Churchill fighting the Germans, fighting Nazi Germany.
In this, the final episode on the Metaverse - or is the Metaverses - we discuss what the Key Players are doing in the space, as well as the so-whats for entrepreneurs and investors. As you, our listeners are accustomed to, only straight talk and “straight shooting” in this duology on the Metaverse. Navigation: Intro (01:34) Section 1: Key players (02:02) Section 2: So-whats for entrepreneurs and investors (22:36) Conclusion (30:35) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Entrepreneur in Residence at Red River West, co-founder of App Annie / Data.ai, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Bertrand Welcome to episode thirty, our second episode on the metaverse. In episode 29, we talk about our definition of the metaverse, we talk about the key enablers for the metaverse. This episode will have two section. One, first section around the key players. And we will have a section about what it means. The so what for entrepreneurs and VCs. Nuno, should we go into the key players? Section 1: Key Players (02:02) Nuno And a very good segue to what the key players are doing around the metaverse or the metaverses and all these different technologies. And maybe sticking to Google again, not because we dislike them particular. I think we've shown them a lot of fondness in the past. But we're starting with another failure, Google Glass, which I already talked about earlier. I love those glasses. They were so cool. There was so much promise in it and then nothing. It was just like, nothing's gonna happen. Sorry guys. Bertrand For me, it was also an example of something that was hyped way too much, way too early, and totally out of context. When you have something for total geek that are only going to touch the most crazy early adopters of all, why do you start to brand it? I remember they were showing off celebrities at modeling shows. It was like crazy. It was as if it was going to be mainstream next month. It's like, wow, a lesson of how to set expectations wrong, as if they did everything they could to make sure it was really going to fail. Because the expectations are so disconnected from the reality of how bad it was. Bad maybe is a strong word. Nuno It wasn't that bad for what it was. I think it's more the point of what you're making, yeah. Bertrand As we see today, it was at least 10 years too early. And you know there is something in history when people tell me, "Oh yeah, we're just 10 years too early." I'm like, "Oh yeah, that's not much, ten years, I guess." I don't like it when people make it wrong by 10 years. There are so many things you could do instead, especially in our world of tech, where in some ways I feel it could be predictable. Google Glass, total fiasco, because it was 10 years too early. But I said 10 or maybe 20. Nuno Maybe 20. Bertrand The jury still out for this until we have something really working. What was about this other company that was promising crazy shit and ultimately went nearly bankrupt? Nuno Magic leap, yeah. By the way, I don't know anyone there. I'm telling our friends just as a way to not throw them under the bus. Yeah, Magic Leap. Bertrand But Magic Leap is a fantastic company. I was from very far smelling a rat. I will call it a rat when you burn billions of dollars and you don't deliver at all anything of value, at least value connected to how much money was invested in the business. I wish them the best in their new version, just focused on enterprise. But there was so much bullshit. And I'm frustrated because some of these companies are so much actively ...
In this episode, we talk about the Metaverse - or is the metaverses? - specify what it is/will be, debunk myths around it and detail its/their key enablers. Everything you wanted to know and also … that you didn’t know you needed to know. This will be followed by episode 30, focusing on understanding what the key players are doing in this realm, as well as implications to entrepreneurs, investors and others. Navigation: Intro (01:34) Section 1: The Typical Silicon Valley hype machine?/ Definition of Metaverse (01:57) Section 2: Key enablers to the Metaverse (17:44) Conclusion (41:21) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Entrepreneur in Residence at Red River West, co-founder at App Annie, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Nuno Welcome to episode 29. In this episode, we will go into the metaverse, not literally, but we will discuss the metaverse, its definitions, how people see it evolving, its core enablers, and some of the lessons learned that we believe entrepreneurs and venture capital firms should have. Bertrand, metaverse, what is the metaverse? Bertrand Big question. I guess that's a billion dollar question. There's been so many definition of what the metaverse is or is not. I like one definition from Matthew Ball—a well respected analyst—and I believe he has his own VC firm. By his definition, "Metaverse is a massively scaled and interoperable network of real time rendered 3D virtual worlds, which can be experienced synchronously and persistently by an effectively unlimited number of users with an individual sense of presence, and with continuity of data such as identity, history, entitlements, objects, communications, and payments." Bertrand That's the full definition. I like it, because you are not missing any piece of the puzzle, at the same time, by its very complexity, I feel it's showing us that it's not an easy definition. It might even be seen as a very contrive definition. If you think about the internet, how different is it really? The 3D part for sure. Beyond that, it's not very clear, actually, except that it's maybe more unified than the internet that we know. You could argue if you are just inside Facebook, how different it is about just being inside Facebook and just never leaving Facebook. Of course it to be horrible, at least from my perspective, using Facebook less and less. That's one vision. Some will say, we'll talk about what it is, but also what it is not. I will quote again Mathew Ball. For him it's not just a virtual world. It's not just a virtual space. It's not just VR. It's not just a digital virtual economy. It's not just a game. It's not just a virtual theme park. It's not a new app store. It's not a New UGC platform. For sure, it's a big buzzword in Silicon Valley these days, especially thanks to meta rebranding itself. Just from that perspective, it was huge on Google trends. Since the renaming of Meta everyone has been Googling what the metaverse is, I guess. What you think, Nuno? Nuno A lot of respect for Matthew Ball as an analyst, and his definition, as sound as all the other definitions that are out there. I have a couple of objections to his definition. It starts with interoperable. It starts with, "The metaverse as a massively scaled and interoperable network of real-time render 3D virtual worlds." Interoperability is not a given in the metaverse. Nobody has told us that the metaverse will be an interoperable bunch of worlds working together. Actually, if I had to make a bet, using my computer engineer hat and architect,
In this episode, we talk about Strategic Investors, detail what they are, their underlying realities and structures of operation, and present the case For and Against them. We also share Lessons Learnt that can be of value to you, if you are an Entrepreneur, a Financial/Institutional VC or a Strategic Investor.  Navigation: Intro (01:33) Section 1: Context Setting (02:44) Section 2: The Bad Examples (12:01) Seciton 3: The Good Examples (21:39) Section 4: Other Players Join the “Party” (36:30) Section 5: Lessons Learnt for Strategic Investors, Entrepreneurs and VCs (41:25) Conclusion (51:31) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Entrepreneur in Residence at Red River West, co-founder at App Annie, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Bertrand: Welcome to episode 28 of Tech DECIPHERED. This is a special episode on the topic of strategic investors. What are they, who are they, and are they helpful, how helpful can they be? I think it's one of the typical questions as an entrepreneur you would have to answer when you are considering getting financing. What type of investors, should I bring on board? And typically, early on, you might look at business angels. You might look at seed fund. And at some point, you would consider working with VCs. And you will probably discover that you have different type of VCs.  On one side the sides we typically hear about in the news, in the press we are talking about more financial VCs. And on the other side of the spectrum you have what is called strategic investors, strategic VCs. Strategic sometimes for short. And we are going to talk about them. Who are they, what are they helpful for, how useful they are, how bad could they be for your business, for your startup.  Welcome, Nuno, good to be with you to discuss this topic. How are you today?  Nuno: I am well, in sunny California, so very well.  Section 1 - Context Setting 
(02:44) Nuno: Maybe starting by defining what is strategic investors and where does that come from? The notion of they invest in, but they also contribute something that is more strategic. Maybe in the form of a partnership, or in the form of resources or other types of things that you put at the table. Normally, strategic investors are looked in the light, or as opposed to financial investors. So investors that are solely driven by the financial return and therefore, also solely driven by the capital that they put in. The world has become a little bit muddy over the last decade or so. There's now, investors that are more what I would call operating investor. So operating investors that jump into the company, and spend a significant part of their time in the company, sometimes even taking a significant part of the company, not just the classic minority in the company. But in order to simplify our discussion today, let's stick to the financial investor side, and the strategic investor side. So a financial investor would be someone like Chameleon, Red River West other VC firms that are out there, Sequoia Capital. We are investors that invest in a company, the biggest upside we can get is really financial. And obviously, we will produce value for the company under the form of helping the company scale, helping the company hire, helping the company get access to resources, and a variety of other things. So there is a little bit more operational minus in VC in general today, but the key objective of the whole thing is financial returns. A strategic investor, in many cases, when we talk about it, we use strategic investor as opposed to corpor...
We deep-dive into the nuanced - and somewhat less than stellar - history of Tech in Europe and how start-ups and investors are making up for lost time, leading to an ever maturing ecosystem, with significant reasons for optimism. Finally, we discuss the increasingly intertwined destinies of US and European Tech.Navigation:Intro (01:33)Section 1: Framing the European start-up and investment landscape (02:20)Section 2: Investment Approach in Europe (17:18)Section 3: Movements from US to Europe (51:19)Section 4: Movements from Europe to US (59:02)Conclusion (1:05:39)Our co-hosts:Bertrand Schmitt, Entrepreneur in Residence at Red River West, co-founder at App Annie, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, @bschmittNuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedroOur show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Nuno: Welcome to episode 27 of Tech Deciphered. We're going to address the tech landscape in Europe, focusing on the investment landscape, as well as the startup landscape, we will go into the typical entrepreneurial approaches as well as investment approaches in Europe, the mindsets, the tactics, the profiles, as well as the typical exits, we will then deep dive into the present state of Europe and how we see it evolve over time.  
 Bertrand: Thank you Nuno, good to be here today with you and to discuss this fascinating topic for us, we are both Europeans. Obviously I'm French, you're from Portugal. We have seen the European landscape changing dramatically over the past 20, 25 years. So that will be very exciting to talk about this. 
 Section 1 - Framing the European startup and investment landscape 
(02:20) Bertrand: I guess maybe we can start about controversies that happened a few months ago in June when The Economist had a big cover on the state of the investment in Europe and how Europe was really not doing much in the tech industry. interestingly enough, there was a quick swift reply from the founder and CEO of Stripe Patrick Collison, who is not just running Stripe from the U S but he's also a European citizen being Irish  
 Nuno: Yeah. His comment was basically saying, all of the points that you raise are great, I think you haven't really shown the case for optimism right? Where there's a lot of great successful companies coming out of Europe. He was mentioning a few that, are obviously runaway successes, like Spotify, Klarna, N26, UIpath, wise and a few others. 
 And he also obviously talks about Stripe and its role, although Stripe is more of an American company, to be honest, but Stripe in its role in working with very innovative companies in Europe as a counter position to the economists headline and main articles in that edition. 
 So to be honest, I think he is onto something in saying there is a case for optimism that wasn't duly manifested in that edition of your magazine or newspaper as they call it. It's very funny cause they call the economists still the newspaper, although it's in my view of magazine.  
 Bertrand: Maybe you want to restate the position of the economist. 
 Nuno: Yeah. The position of the economist is that basically the U S has taken over, right? You have companies like apple that are worth more in their view than 30 firms in the German blue-chip Dax index combined. Obviously we have Amazon, we have Microsoft, we have Google all these are multi-trillion dollar companies now, actually. 
 And so their point is, in some ways, Europe has lagged behind. I think their point was very focused also on the old Europe and where, even the big emerging tech winners, like SAP took a long time to get to fruition,
In our second and final episode on the Bubble, we share what is happening in Venture Capital, on the exit - IPO, M&A, etc - front, as well as share clear “so-whats” for entrepreneurs and VCs. For in-depth views on the status of the economy, listen to our previous episode, episode 25. Navigation: Section 1: What is happening in VC? (02:05) Section 2: Exits are great, though, right?! (17:52) Section 3: So-what? Implications for entrepreneurs and VCs (25:57) Conclusion (43:49) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Nuno: Welcome to episode 26 of tech deciphered. This episode will conclude our two-part series on the bubble and why we actually believe there is one going on. In this episode, we will discuss the VC landscape and how it is evolving. We will talk about exits, not just IPOs, but also other types of exits like mergers and acquisitions and how that landscape is looking like. And finally, we will end up with something pragmatic, the "so what", the takeaways, the implications for both entrepreneurs and investors.  Section 1 - What is happening in Venture Capital? 
(02:05) Nuno: Moving to venture capital, there's a lot of interesting elements to talk about. Some really interesting analysis from our friend Tom Tunguz but also of what's happening in the macro space, some analysis of what we've seen from PitchBook and CB insights, it seems we're going to have an incredible year in venture capital. This is it. There's no crisis there's a ton of money, dry powder, there's new funds, I actually have a new fund going. So I'm very happy with that, but in some ways it's like, woh, this is all fantastic. Increasing everything, increasing everything, more deals, more money deployed. We're all great. We're going to have, a flagship year in venture capital. And somehow I'm like I like being in the market. We just closed our first deal, which is great. Thank you. So what's going to happen? In our micro world of startups and entrepreneurs and venture capital firms, 2021 is going to be an amazing year, but what's going to happen? Bertrand: Yeah. And to share some numbers it's pretty insane what we see. And for me, what's crazy is that it's at every range. So maybe it varies by country, by industry, but overall if I take Series A valuations, for instance, you have seen a jump from what? like more than 50% in two quarters this is the very definition of insanity. I'm not sure if we have ever seen that, and it's happening. At every level in the stack. So maybe early on in the pandemic, it was less true that it was at every level of the stack. Maybe, initially it was more: you are only investing in people you already knew, in companies you already knew, the first quarter or two. And because you are not used to work like this, you didn't know how long it would be like this. So you had a different approach that maybe favored existing companies bigger rounds, insider the rounds. But now I believe that we're at a stage where it's not at all about that anymore.  Or not just that anymore. It cannot be: to stay competitive you have to stay in the market, you have to invest. And maybe on that point maybe not every fund agree. We have a wide range from Tiger Global investing I forgot how many deals a day, actually 1.3 deals a day from Tiger global these days.  But at the other extreme in a global ranking I have not seen Sequoia U S in the top 10 investors. So I wonder if there is less investment from them and they decided that right now is n...
Is this a bubble? If so, what type of bubble? Where are we heading? We share our views on where the economy is going, the importance and effect of COVID, several key opinions on both sides of the spectrum and land on whether the current situation is sustainable or not. Navigation: Introduction (01:33) Section 1: The COVID effect (02:43) Section 2: The economy...stupid? (11:08) Conclusion (43:33) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Bertrand: Welcome to Tech Deciphered Episode 25. So this episode 25 is part of a 2-serie episodes: episode 25 and 26 that will be around the current bubble. We believe that at this stage from a big macro perspective there are a lot of questions around where's the economy going, and this would be the topic of episode 25, that big picture perspective on where is the economy going? Of course, all of this being impacted big time by COVID. We'll talk a bit about that. We'll talk about inflation, prices where all of this is going from a macro perspective. In episode 26 we will talk more about, in more details, what does it mean for entrepreneurs, tech entrepreneurs, tech industry, VCs, where the VC landscape going, where are exits going, and what does it mean for me as an entrepreneur or me as a VC? Nuno: And today we start with, where is the economy heading, all the macro conditions that are happening in the market and their implications. Bertrand? Section 1 - COVID effect 
(02:43) Bertrand: We have to start with COVID it has so much impact, not just on our lives, but on the state of the economy, on some big decision on the financial market side, on additional government interventions, or not. So I would say it's a very mixed picture. I think I had a sense of optimism that day to day life was going in the right direction just maybe a month ago, even if I was, and we were being both realistic as we discussed in some previous episodes. Back to normal, like international travels and the like, as we used to do on a regular basis might just be for some time next year, maybe summer next year. I guess there are some serious concern that our basic everyday life might be back to some sort of war footings. In where I live in Seattle area, King county, we are back to mask mandates indoor. It's not yet forced, but I guess it will be there soon. It's highly recommended we all heard about the CDC recent news also advising for masks mandates indoors for everyone. Vaccinated or not. It seems it's both because we cannot trust people who are not wearing their masks, that they have been vaccinated and because now there is also the risk that even if are vaccinated with delta, you might harbor the virus and share it with others. And I guess, in your region in the bay, it's also back to mask mandates. This time it's mandatory actually indoor. Nuno: From what I just saw. And, basically I got information from a club that I'm actually a member of that everyone now in San Francisco should wear a mask indoor, irrespective of being vaccinated or not. My understanding it's going to be mandatory at least for a period of time, but I'm not fully sure. Certainly there is a step back. From what was promising to be very nice summer for everyone. If you're vaccinated, you don't need to wear anything, et cetera, et cetera. In some ways, leaving this to the criteria of people wasn't a wise idea in the first place, because how do I know that someone's vaccinated or not? We saw a little bit of reverse engineering later on.
Episode 24 ends our trilogy on Silicon Valley and our “no bs” contextualization: from its history, geography and its most common and core myths.  In this episode, we deep dive on our Silicon Valley loves (and hates) and finally address the elephant in the room: is there an exodus going on or not? Has Silicon Valley’s downfall started or is it highly exaggerated? Listen to our most contentious podcast yet. Navigation: Introduction (01:33) Section 1: Hates (02:19) Section 2: Loves (33:51) Section 3: The Future of Silicon Valley (54:41) Conclusion (1:13:09) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34)Nuno: So today in episode 24 of tech deciphered, we'll be finalizing our trilogy on Silicon valley. Our non bullshit view on Silicon valley, which started in episode 22, talking about what Silicon valley is and what brought us here, then continues in episode 23, with an episode specifically on the mythology of Silicon valley and our sevent myths of Silicon valley. And today we will end with love, hate - our areas of love and our areas  of hate of Silicon valley and the bay area. And we will finalize with Silicon valley in transition. Is there an Exodus? Is this a mindset? Is this a geography? What will happen to this region? Bertrand? Section 1 - Hates (02:19) Bertrand: Should we start with things we love or things we hate?  Nuno: I started with hate let's start with hate. And then we go to love. Yes. Bertrand: Let's start with hate. That sounds very very harsh, but there are some reasons to be harsh about Silicon valley, not everything is the paradise you can read from far. Nuno: Yeah. So maybe starting with the most obvious of them all, with crime safety, homelessness, and here we have to be very specific because obviously there's this situation for example, of San Francisco and crime and homelessness in San Francisco, which is pretty pervasive. And in some ways it's been a little bit amped up also with COVID as a lot of people left town and certainly are working more remotely. But definitely there is a problem in San Francisco. There's a problem also elsewhere, Oakland, I think is having a little bit of what I would call a Renaissance. It's getting and becoming an exciting city and and solving a lot of its issues. But obviously we know the history of crime in Oakland is also a very serious one. And then you have places that have obviously no crime at all, like Atherton, the richest town in America or the wealthiest town in America where, finding crime is probably difficult. So really a tale of two bay areas, so to speak or to Silicon valleys   Bertrand: Sorry let's not forget east Palo Alto  Nuno: Yeah. You have these dichotomies exactly to your point Bertrand, where you have Palo Alto, which we know next to Stanford and where a lot of very wealthy people live like mark Zuckerberg and others which is in general, relatively safe here, and then just east Palo Alto, which is not as safe.  Bertrand: The other side of the highway. Nuno: literally the other side of the 1 0 1. And so again, in some ways it's a little bit quintessential American, right? We know that from other cities like Chicago and in LA and other parts of the U S where you have certain areas that have  for a variety of reasons a significant amount of lack of safety and crime and all of that. And then you have areas that are extremely safe and extremely  controlled in terms of crime as well. So I think the first hate we probably both sha...
In episode 23, we demystify 7 of the most common and core myths on Silicon Valley, from its laid-backness to “everyone is amazing”.  Check out episode 22, where we explain what Silicon Valley actually is, talk about its history and geography. In episode 24, we will deep dive on our Silicon Valley loves (and hates) and finally address the elephant in the room: is there an exodus going on or not? Has Silicon Valley’s downfall started or is it highly exaggerated? Navigation: Intro (01:34) Myth 1 - Laid Back (04:25) Myth 2 - Not Transactional (16:11) Myth 3 - Self-Confidence and Assertiveness (27:22) Myth 4 - Ton of Capital Available (37:29) Myth 5 - Everyone is Amazing (47:31) Myth 6 - Failure Always Rewarded (55:17) Myth 7 - “Changing the World…” (1:00:49) Conclusion (1:04:49) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, Managing Partner, Founder at Chamaeleon, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Bertrand: Welcome to episode 23 of tech deciphered. This would be our second episode of our trilogy around Silicon Valley. If you remember how  previous episode, episode 22 was about what is Silicon valley, as well as what brought us there. For this episode, we're going to talk about the myth of Silicon Valley versus reality. And we are going to share with you seven myths that we have seen over these years, and we believe come a long way explaining how Silicon valley really work. Nuno: This started in some ways  with an article I wrote, I think in 2016 and I have four myths in that article. So today we're going to expand on that. Bertrand has come up with a couple more and that whole story started  with two things, one with an entrepreneur that reached out to me and I used to have a lot of requests on LinkedIn via email  semi warm intros from friends about someone from another was coming to Silicon valley or was visiting, was going to come to Silicon valley to visit and meet with potential customers or investors. But this particular entrepreneur that shall go un-named reached out to me and we had several people in common. It was a relatively cold reach out. And then he just sent me a follow-up message saying, I'm going there for a visit. Can you introduce me to Google, Facebook, all these companies. And I was like, why am I bugged by this? And as I started thinking through it I started actually taking it one step further, which was, I am bugged by it because people have this understanding of Silicon valley that is fundamentally wrong. And that's where this whole mythology came from.  In some ways we had people that we knew in common. We had acquaintances, not even really close friends, but I did not know this person. And that was one of the first things that bugged me. It's like, why is he asking me for things? I introduced him to people why? I don't know this guy.  And so again, I started going through it, and the second trigger for me to write this article, the myths of the Bay area back in 2016 which is still on Medium  if you want to take a look at it, I was about to be doing a keynote for an organization that I was a co-founder of called west to west, which was really linking  Portugal to Silicon valley, the two west coast as we call them and really helping entrepreneurs figure out how to best go to market in the U S how to best connect with talents in US, customers, potential investors, et cetera. So I came up with four  myths that really helped me frame in some ways, a little bit of my messaging back to entrepreneurs that are not classically from Silicon valley,
In episode 22, we begin the second season of Tech Deciphered, by deep diving into what Silicon Valley is, what made us (and others) move here, its unabridged mythology and whether there is really an exodus (or not) going on. This episode is the beginning of a trilogy that is an ode to our love and hate relationship with the region. Navigation: Intro (01:34) Section 1: What (exactly) is Silicon Valley? (02:23) Section 2: What brought us (and others) to Silicon Valley? (32:15) Conclusion (46:09) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34)Nuno: Welcome to season two of Tech Deciphered. Today, because we like to do really long episodes, we will start our trilogy on Silicon Valley. This episode will focus on what Silicon Valley actually is. We'll go into the geography of Silicon Valley, the origins of Silicon Valley, the development of Silicon Valley. Then we will also talk about what brought us here, what brought Bertrand and myself to Silicon Valley.  In the next few episodes, we will go into the mythology and reality of Silicon Valley as well as other areas of love and hate , and we will finalize with Silicon Valley in transition. Is it a mindset? Is there an Exodus? Is there a no exodus?Bertrand: Thank you Nuno, good to be here with you today.  How are you?Nuno: I'm well, so let's start with what is Silicon Valley? Section 1 - What (exactly) is Silicon Valley?Today we start with what is Silicon Valley? And one could say Silicon Valley is a state of mind, but it's actually a region of the world with a long history behind it. Bertrand do you want to guide us a little bit through the long history of Silicon Valley and where we're at?Bertrand: Yeah, sure. So as you say, it's a long history, but that depends by which standard? Nuno: For someone from France and Portugal probably not very long, but yes.Bertrand: Or ChinaNuno: Long from a US perspective, I guess. Bertrand: It's one of these places where you don't have much standing that is more than a hundred years old, and one could argue, it might be because of earthquakes. But not just, I would say the modern California is probably and Northern California is probably 150 years old, started with the Gold rush.And maybe before I go to the gold rush, obviously California was  in some ways discovered by the Europeans  500 years ago Nuno if we go back  to the origins of California and Northern California, and it was a spaniard, a Portuguese?   Nuno: We will not have that discussion. And obviously it's not questioned whether it was discovered, it was here, and there were native people here and then.  The Spanish conquistadores arrived. There is some argumentation whether Cabrillo  was actually Portuguese or Spanish, but he was definitely working for the Spaniards.So we'll let them do that. We'll let the Spanish people get that.Bertrand: Yes.  So California  was interspersed by a lot of missions and that connected the main roads. Actually historically the main road in Silicon Valley, El Camino Real, Nuno you want to say what it means.Nuno: Yeah, the Royal way. So it was a way that was put there to connect the different missions. And it was the Royal way because the Spaniards were here at the service of obviously the monarchy in Spain. And that's why it was called the Royal way or Camino Real. So now, you know.  Bertrand: And so, that's for me interesting part of Silicon Valley to think that you are on the Royal way most of the time when you are ...
In episode 21, we will end our first season of Tech Deciphered, by taking  a look back at 2020 - spoiler alert: defined by something starting with a C and ending with a 9 - as well as what we expect to happen in 2021. We will share our answers on questions like: Will we finally get rid of this pandemic? Is there a bubble in the public equity market in the US? We will also share our own personal lessons-learnt. For a more in-depth look at the future and the 2020s, please listen to episodes 11, 12 and 13, and for a more detailed view on COVID-19, please also listen to episodes 9A and 9B. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Moment of Silence - In Memoriam (02:32) Section 1 - Recap on 2020 (03:00) Section 2 - Personal stories (26:11) Section 3 - COVID-19 and Macro Outlook for 2021 (32:10) Section 4 - Outlook for Tech in 2021 (42:42) Season 2 Preview & Conclusion (51:24) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast
In episode 20, the last of our trilogy on recruiting, we share advice to candidates, from ideas and processes on how to best be visible to recruiters, to how to get the job of your dreams. Also listen to our episodes 18 and 19, in which we share our core principles in recruiting and detailed advice to recruiters. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - How to get found (02:10) Section 2 - How to get the first interview (04:08) Section 3 - Interview questions (07:13) Section 4 - How to get the offer (23:56) Section 5 - Remote world (29:00) Conclusion (39:59) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:24) Nuno: Welcome to episode 20. This episode, will conclude our trilogy on recruiting.  In episodes 18 and 19. We've discussed a variety of topics. We introduced the element of recruiting. We shared our own core principles around recruiting, and in the last episode, episode 19, we gave advice to recruiters.  Today, we will be discussing advice for candidates all the way from being found to how to be recruited in a changing remote world. Bertrand: Let's take the other side. Let's think from a candidate perspective. What could be our advice for candidates. And obviously there is probably a lot of advice we can give.  Section 1 - How to get found (02:10) Nuno, do you want to start on maybe how to get found? Nuno: Yes, and just to reframe this, this is not just based on third-party knowledge in the last decade, because both of us, have not been candidates, cetera, . I certainly have been reached out by a number of organizations. I've explored things beyond my own realm. And there's obviously a lot of lessons learnt here that I think are still very fresh. The first piece is how do you get found, right? Who finds you and how do you make yourself visible in the market?  definitely LinkedIn, your profile needs to be clean. It needs to be clear and sharp about what you're able to do or not. My LinkedIn profile is awful for that, just to be clear. So please don't look at my LinkedIn profile to get any great clues on that, having clarity in what you've done and what you're an expert on and what are your achievements have been Turning your LinkedIn into a richer type of resume is very powerful. If you're an engineer, Github Gitlab and other tools also convey a lot of these elements of being found in the market.  so that's the beginning. It's almost like your advertising systems and services that you want to be present on for recruiting depending on the area you're in. Obviously you should explore. Having some warm relationships with recruiters. And particularly as you get more senior and you moved to a middle level ranks or senior level ranks. knowing your recruiters and having them, having your mind. I believe that recruiters in Europe and Asia, I've shared this with many of my friends, external recruiters in Europe and Asia are less transactional than in the US and because of that, they normally keep warmer relationships with candidates through the years. I certainly have warmer relationships. With some of the recruiters that I interacted with in Asia and in Europe and maybe in the us, this is again, a simplification obviously it varies very much with the recruiter and the individual, himself or herself. but definitely understand where the recruiters are, what's being done, et cetera. And then the final piece around being found is if you're looking for a specific type of job,
In episode 19, we share detailed advice to recruiters, sharing views on job descriptions, finding talent, interview process, good and difficult interview questions, other hacks, as well as our own “pet peeves”. This is the second episode on recruiting. In episode 18, we framed the discussion and shared our core recruiting principles, including in compensation, and in the design and development of the recruiting organization. Episode 20 will end our trilogy, by focusing on detailed advice to candidates. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - The Job Description (02:00) Section 2 -  Hacks & Tools (10:19) Section 3 - Finding Talent (15:04) Section 4 - Interview Process (18:14) Section 5 - Other Hacks (31:52) Section 6 - Pet Peeves and Dislikes (39:17) Conclusion (41:27) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, business angel, advisor to startups and VC funds, co-founder at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:24)Bertrand: Welcome to episode 19. This is the second episode in a trilogy of episodes on recruiting that started previously, with episode 18. In this new episode, we are going to focus on the recruiter side: writing a job description, the tools and approach to find talent, the interview process, global differences, the evergreen approach to recruiting, closing candidates. And we will conclude on our pet peeves and dislikes.Section 1 - The job description (02:00)Nuno: And maybe switching and going into the weeds a little bit on advice that we would specifically have for recruiters and starting with the job description.  The job description is normally this painful thing that someone has to do that involves some copy pasting, hopefully if there's a template or some Googling in the middle, to define what the job looks like.I think this is absolutely the wrong approach, just to be clear. A job description, I think has two sides to it. There should be an external job description, which is manifested to the market. That can be used with external recruiters, that can be used with candidates directly. And that should be sharp and really conveying what hard skills are being looked for, what soft skills are being looked for, what is the value system of the organization, and obviously a brief description of the organization, and finally, a little bit on how that position would fit in terms of roles and responsibilities within the organization. Those four or five things need to at least be there.It should be sharp, it shouldn't be a three page job description. I've seen seven page job descriptions. I'm like, why?Bertrand: No way.Nuno:  Is anyone gonna read that? And sharp should be one page, very clear, there should be a lot of attention to the words that you use and the clarity on it.And it should really be appealing. It is a marketing material. I'm not saying it's not, but it should also be clear in filtering people that have certain skills versus others, people that have a certain value system versus others, et cetera. Then there's a little bit the internal job description, which also should be very clear. Which is, who is this person going to report to, what are going to be the day to day of this person, the complexity of it, et cetera.I'm not sure that needs to be manifested in a very formal way. But there should be clear understanding around the table, from the hiring manager all the way, maybe to the CEO early on in the company, to the person that's managing the recruiting process so that there is clarity on what works and what doesn't.
In episode 18, the first of our trilogy on recruiting, we start by sharing our core principles in this space. We delve into high-level principles, recruiting organization and compensation. In episodes 19 and 20, we will share detailed advice for recruiters and candidates, respectively. On the recruiter side, we share core principles that have worked for us, as well as hacks: anything from good and difficult interview questions to some of our “pet peeves”. On the candidate side, we will share ideas and processes from how to best be visible to recruiters, to how to get the job of your dreams. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Core principles (04:59) Section 2 - Recruiting organization (18:34) Section 3 - Compensation (26:13) Conclusion (31:05) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:24) Nuno: So in this episode, 18, we focus on recruiting. We will discuss on the recruiter side, our core principles that have worked for us along the years, as well as some hacks and some advice for recruiters. On the candidate side, we share ideas and processes from how to best be visible to recruiters, all the way to how to get the job of your dreams. Looking forward to this episode. Bertrand: Yes, and actually we have so much content on Recruiting, that we will have 3 episodes focused on this topic: this episode 18, as well as episode 19 and 20.  Bertrand: I'm very excited that we talk about recruiting, probably not much is more important than recruiting when you're starting a company, running a business, running a startup. And it's recruiting of everyone from your co-founders, to your execs, to your developers, to your sales people. So recruiting is literally the lifeblood of your organization and obviously not just recruiting but keeping people and having people happy and successful at your organization. But it starts at the end of the day with recruiting. So it's exciting to talk about this topic in this episode. Nuno: Indeed. And let's start with framing our experience as recruiters, to give a little bit of credibility to whatever advice we give during this episode. I'll start with my side, I've recruited or help recruit hundreds of people, all the way from recruiting for my own teams as either a line manager, CEO, managing partner, helping recruit peers to myself in different organizations. Helping some of my clients as a consultant recruit their own people. That was also a lot of fun. And I participated in everything from, one-on-one interviews to panel interviews, to group interviews and everything under the sun. I would also add as a candidate, that my experience is still relatively fresh. A lot of people would look at my background and say, you haven't been a candidate for a long time. You did your own venture firm, et cetera. But in all honesty, I've joined boards of directors, both for profit companies and nonprofit companies. And that goes through its own recruiting process. I've tried to be recruited by a bunch of companies in the industry along the years. And funnily enough, because I'm a bit of a nerd. I actually sometimes go into these processes, even though I'm not necessarily thinking of moving on. And I've had some really interesting processes with some of the best known companies in the industry. And hopefully we'll also share some of my lessons learned around it. Last but not the least, I've been very close to the recruiting space, through a bunch of people in my own network that are very close to me.
In this, the third and final episode of our SaaS Primer - or “everything you wanted to know about SaaS” - we look into Financing/Fundraising, share findings on Benchmarking/KPIs, as well as end the discussion on Lessons Learnt and Predictions. Do listen to episodes 15 and 16, in which we had a SaaS Overview, looked at Business Models, as well as Sales and Pricing. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Financing/Fundraising (02:01) Section 2 - Benchmarking/KPIs (16:08) Section 3 - Lessons Learnt (29:07) Section 4 - Predictions and Conclusion (46:19) Conclusion Resources Please check below to download our SaaS Primer PDF deck, serving as reference for our episodes 15-16-17 Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Download Tech Deciphered SaaS Primer PDF Deck Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:24) Bertrand: Welcome to Episode 17 of Tech Deciphered .  In this episode 17, our third and last episode of our SaaS Primer, we're going to talk about financing, benchmarking, lessons learned, and our predictions, to conclude, about where is going the SaaS Industry. For further reference, please have a listen to our previous episodes, episode 15 and episode 16, where we started this SaaS Primer . Nuno, let's start today with financing. Section 1 - Financing / Fundraising (02:01) Nuno: In financing, our first analysis is around equity capital raised by ARR. So Annual Recurring Revenue that has been achieved by the company. Not a huge amount of surprises, but maybe the sole surprise is that companies are raising more equity capital at earlier stages. Definitely, it seems pretty capital intensive that we have, for example, companies generating less than 1 million in ARR, 10% of those companies having raised $5 to $10 million. 6% of the company's raising 10 to $20 million. That seems like a very hefty bar to start generating such little ARR, in companies that are generating a lot more ARR, so above $50 million, 65% of companies unshockingly or not very shockingly will have raised more than $50 million by then. And then very few, I'd say 12%, 12%, 12% will have just raised anywhere from below $5 million, $10 to $20 million, and $20 to $50 million. It seems to be no man's land for above 50 million, seems to be 5 to 10 million. So no companies that are raising more than 50 million will have raised only 5 to 10 million, which is again, an interesting counter-intuitive realization. We will come back to the point around how much money do you need to raise, to actually generate significant ARR. The reality is, the later you are in the ARR curve, the more ARR you're generating, the likelier you are to be in the midst of basically blitz-scaling your organization in particular sales and marketing organization, we've talked about it in previous episodes. And if that's the case, then at that point, it's the time where you raise a lot of capital. So it seems a little bit counter intuitive. A lot of people would say, once I get to 2.5, 10 million in ARR, I need less to get to the next level. Actually that's, in many cases, when you need more to get the next level, cause you actually need to buy yourself into the next wave and that way to buy into the next wave is to hire a lot of people around sales and marketing. Bertrand: Yeah, I think that, as we discussed in the previous episodes, there are big expectations from a lot of investors, in term of how fast you're growing the business. And definitely, one way to grow fast is to invest cash,  so that you can grow faster.
In this episode, the second part of our SaaS Primer trilogy, we deep dive into Sales and Pricing in the Software-as-a-service space. For further context, please listen to episode 15, in which we did an Overview of SaaS and its intrinsic Business Models. Please look out for our next episode that will conclude our Primer, with deep-dives on Financing/Fundraising, Benchmarking/KPIs, Lessons Learnt and Predictions. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Sales (01:52) Section 2 - Pricing (20:40) Conclusion (36:58) Resources Please check below to download our SaaS Primer PDF deck, serving as reference for our episodes 15-16-17 Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Download Tech Deciphered SaaS Primer PDF Deck Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:24)Nuno: Today in episode 16, we will have our second episode on our "software as a service" primer.For further reference, please also listen to our episode 15, where we started this discussion.Today, we will talk about sales and pricing, and we will go a little bit in depth into these topics. And we will see where the discussion heads. As always, we always get very verbose when we get excited, as you guys know.Section 1 - SalesBertrand: Exactly. Let's start today on the sales side. The sales motion, the sales process is obviously a critical part of any business. But, SaaS has its own approach to sales, and it's very tightly connected to the financing, obviously, we'll talk later about financing. What do we see as a benchmark of percentage spend of sales and marketing, as a percentage of ARR? What we can see, and we are leveraging some slides from Openview Partners, is that across the range, you are at the lowest, around 30 percent of spend in sales and marketing early on, below the $2.5 million ARR barrier. And then it goes up, 35, 40, potentially 45 percent of spend, on median. From $2.5 million, to 10, to 20, to 50, beyond 50. This is a median, so we see a pretty wide range, plus or minus, 15 percent of these numbers.So if I were to take a different stage, we can see that the wider range would be from 15 to 60 percent being spent in sales and marketing. So widely different range, and usually it depends on the business model. If you have a more product-led growth, you will spend less in sales and marketing. If you're a more traditional, I would call it old-school, SaaS approach, you will usually end up with higher sales and marketing spend. Nuno: And I would highlight two interesting pieces of this chart. One. It seems once you get to a certain critical mass of ARR, let's say about $15 million in this case that the costs will start reducing as a percentage of your ARR, which makes sense. You can start optimizing you have a certain scale and a certain brand, and there's a lot of things you can do.The second effect, which might actually correlate to that as well is in many cases, companies are growing really fast to get into the 50 million ARR or a hundred million ARR. So they are spending way into the market, and we discussed it in our previous episode, they're doing a land grab type strategy.And so there may be overspending on sales or on marketing overall for customer acquisition. And therefore, once they taper at 50 million or 100 million, they might actually then optimize their sales and marketing costs. Also underlines at some point, let's say the a hundred million mark, 120 million mark , would you want to go public as a company and therefore at that stage,
In this episode, we start our Primer on SaaS - Software-as-a-Service - a trilogy on everything you need to know about SaaS. We will give an Overview of SaaS, as well as discuss the intrinsic Business Models. Please look out for our next episodes that will deep-dive into Sales, Pricing, Financing, Benchmarking/KIPs, Lessons Learnt and Predictions.Navigation:Introduction (01:24)Section 1 - Overview (04:39)Section 2 - Business Model (17:59)Conclusion (45:19)ResourcesPlease check below to download our SaaS Primer PDF deck, serving as reference for our episodes 15-16-17Our co-hosts:Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmittNuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedroOur show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Download Tech Deciphered SaaS Primer PDF Deck Subscribe To Our Podcast Full transcription: may contain unintentionally confusing, inaccurate and/or amusing transcription errorsIntro (01:24)Bertrand: Welcome to episode 15. In today's episode, we will talk about SaaS. What is SaaS?What does SaaS mean? SaaS means Software-as-a-Service. This is, and we will talk more about that later on, but this has become over the past decade, one of the most successful way to distribute and monetize software. Why is that? We'll talk more    about that, but in a nutshell, SaaS is really a new philosophy and approach to software, that emerged around 20 years ago, as a way to deliver, a centrally-hosted application over the internet, as a service.In the past, you had to have your own server. You have to install your server. You have to upgrade and maintain your server, and you have to install software on every user laptop or desktop. It was very complex to maintain, to manage, but also on the pricing side, in the past, you would pay a very big license fee for your server, for your desktop license, and you would keep paying, a smaller amount, a maintenance fee, every year, usually for technical improvement. But you will have to keep managing your software server and clients side, for years. And it will become very difficult and complex, and you would have to keep up with improvements in the software. And it was difficult to keep up.What SaaS enabled, software-as-a-service, was, you don't have to manage the server side anymore. It was pioneered by companies like Salesforce, like Netsuite. So no more central IT costs to manage all of this, and the software would be distributed on the internet through your browser, so no need to install a specific software. And pricing was also changed as a result, no need for a big upfront license cost. You would pay every month, every quarter, every year. You could stop any time, or once a year, using the service, suddenly become much easier to consider trying a new service. It would become much easier to distribute that new service, and more important, much more alignment, between customers and supplier.Why? Because suddenly, the customer can leave anytime. Or at least once a year in most cases. And what this means is that it pushed suppliers to make sure their software was of really good quality. And on top of it, usually, much more focused on satisfying end user and consumers, not just making sure they check boxes with central IT.So it has been an evolution. It started 20 years ago. It started to ramp up with the last financial crisis in 2008, when companies decided it's time to give it a try. There was at the time, still some worries around storing your data somewhere else, not controlling your server equipment, infrastructure, and while there is still that worries, there is probably an acknowledgement today that these guys,
In this episode, we will deep dive into the world of productivity tools, processes, habits and hacks. We will share our principles of productivity, calendaring, favorite communication, hardware and broader productivity tools (e.g. CRM). Finally, we will share what tools we are still missing and wish we had. As an “easter egg”, we will also share how to best get in touch with us, so do listen in. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Principles of Productivity (02:20) Section 2 - Calendaring & Tasks (13:35) Section 3 - Communication Tools (28:30) Section 4 - Broader Productivity Tools (Note taking, CRM, LinkedIn, etc) (43:51) Section 5 - Hardware (51:54) Section 6 - Tools We Wish We Had (59:03) Conclusion (1:03:10) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Full transcription: may contain unintentionally confusing, inaccurate and/or amusing transcription errors Intro (01:24) Nuno: Episode 14. In this episode, we will deep dive into the world of productivity tools, processes, habits, and hacks. We will share our principles of productivity, calendaring, favorite communication, and broader productivity tools like CRM. Finally, we will share what tools we're still missing and wish we had. We will also share some hardware and some gadgets. As an Easter egg, we will also share how to best get in touch with us. So do listen in  Bertrand: Hi Nuno, I think that's so very interesting topic for today. Definitely more tactical than usual coming out of a trilogy of the next decade but I think we got a lot of interest on this topic as well, and ultimately that's one topic that can make us better hopefully near immediately. I hope at least you will find some interesting habits and ideas.  Section 1 - Principles of Productivity (02:20) Nuno: And the first section today is going to be around some principles of productivity. So just sharing the high level, how do we think through productivity for ourselves? How do we organize ourselves? What do we optimize for, you know, how do we think through things? And so maybe I'll start and we'll go from there. The first thing for me is, productivity is everything, you know, the ability to optimize my time. To make the most out of my time, so that I have time for myself on a personal level, but I also have time to interact with people, have meetings, calls, time to work, time to actually do some works, do some thinking, write a memo, do a power point presentation, review actual work. All of that's really, really important. So I spend  a ton of time, literally, normally, actually on my Sundays planning my week, thinking through what are the flows of my week. We'll get to calendaring in a second, but really thinking through what sort of things am I trying to get out of this? And it's very easy to get sort of stuck into tactical stuff, the day to day, do I do 30 minutes conversations or do I do one hour conversations? Do I do a coffee for this? And then I need to go for that. Under COVID, life is a bit easier because we're just back to back in zoom calls, but actually during normal life, we actually have to travel. So, you know, thinking through, do I want to go to that place that day to San Francisco, do you want to go to Menlo park? Do I want to fly to somewhere else? And how many days would I stay there? So all of that, I spent an actual amount of time just around planning.  Once in a while I have moments, I can't say they're very well established, but I have moments maybe a couple of times a year where I go back to the dr...
In this, the third and final episode on the 2020s decade, we look forward, with our scenario planning methodology, into the late 2020s and specifically discuss Next Platforms & Structural Tech, Venture Capital & Start-ups and end with an overall framing of the decade ahead of us. This concludes our 2020s “Time Travel Trilogy”, in which in episode 11, we deep-dived into what lies ahead on the Governmental/Geopolitical and Non-Governmental arenas, as well as shifts in User Paradigms around Work, Home and Mobility. In episode 12, we continued projecting forward in the decade, delving into the future of Energy & Climate Change, Healthcare, Education, Financial Services, Retail & Commerce, Leisure & Entertainment and Social & Communication. Please listen to these episodes, as well. Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Next Platforms & Structural Tech (02:30) Section 2 - Venture Capital & Start-ups (32:48) Section 3 - Overall framing of the 2020s (50:46) Conclusion (56:07) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Full transcription: may contain unintentionally confusing, inaccurate and/or amusing transcription errors Intro (01:24) Nuno: In this episode 13, on the decade of the 2020s, the decade ahead of us, we will be resuming our scenario planning exercise for a couple of other topics. We will be discussing next platforms, technology infrastructure, and the structural tech layers, VCs and startups and how that world will evolve, and we will then bring it all together in some overall framing of the 2020s and their scenarios. For further reference, please listen to our episode 11 and 12, where we talk a lot about a variety of things: the home, work and mobility use cases, we discuss various industries like healthcare, energy, climate change. So listen to our previous episodes that are concluded today in our trilogy of the 2020s. Let's start today with next platforms, the scenarios for what the world will look like in 2029, 2030, around next platforms Section 1 - Next platforms & Structural Tech (02:30) Next platforms - Deep tech Bertrand:  So let's talk about deep tech and deep tech is a fantastic topic to start,   episode 13 today. There are of course, a lot of topics in deep tech and we cannot cover all of them, but let's start with space. I think what has been amazing was just a few days ago, SpaceX, sent humans to the space station and it worked,  they are in great shape. I believe it was nine years, since the last time astronauts have been sent to the ISS from the US, not needing a hitch from the Russians.  I must say it has been amazing. The last 10 years, what SpaceX has achieved, moving from... I'm not sure they had a single rocket working 10 years ago, to sending now humans, and not just sending humans to the ISS, but sending humans through a very, very cost-effective rocket with a state-of-the-art shuttle. It's really amazing. So when you think about 10 years from now, what could be there? Could we ready be on Mars? Nuno what's  Nuno: I don't know. everyone keeps saying it's the next frontier. There are certainly a lot of things that we can do in space, around low orbits, around communication, around infrastructure that helps us, for example, visualize what's happening earth, and making more powerful, our decision making processes here on earth. So there's certainly a lot of potential that I see in space. I'm not sure we're gonna start colonizing things by the end of the decade, so I'm not sure we'll have people in the moon or we will get to M...
In this episode, the second part of our discussion on the 2020s, we will use our scenario planning methodology to project forward into the latter part of the 2020 decade, so that we can deep-dive into the future of Energy & Climate Change, Healthcare, Education, Financial Services, Retail & Commerce, Leisure & Entertainment and Social & Communication.  Please also listen to our previous episode 11, where we started our time traveling and discussed the Macro landscape - both Governmental/Geopolitical and Non-Governmental, and also User Paradigms around Work, Home and Mobility. Join us for our next episode, episode 13, which will conclude our “Time Travel Trilogy” of the 2020 decade, by delving into Next Platforms & Tech, Venture capital & Start-ups and an overall framing of the 2020s.  Navigation: Introduction (01:24) Section 1 - Energy & Climate Change (02:03) Section 2 - Healthcare (06:30) Section 3 - Education (10:06) Section 4 - Financial Services (14:49) Section 5 - Retail & Commerce (18:13) Section 6 - Leisure & Entertainment (25:26) Section 7 - Social & Communication (41:18) Conclusion (47:13) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show: Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Full transcription: may contain unintentionally confusing, inaccurate and/or amusing transcription errors Intro (01:24) Bertrand: Welcome back to Tech Deciphered episode 12 on the 2020s.  If you remember our previous episode, episode 11, we started talking about the 2020s, our view about the next decade. Trying to do some scenario planning, trying to project what are the  possible scenarios in 10 years from now of where the world will be. Where some technologies will be. Where some consumer habits will be, and try to walk back from that perspective  and think carefully about what it means and how it could happen or not happen. And obviously, share our opinions of the most likely  scenarios. Section 1 - Energy & Climate Change (02:03) Nuno: And we will start today with energy and climate change. I'm generally optimistic about the discussion around climate change coming out of this shelter in place and lockdowns that we've had around the world. Where people are seeing the effects that we actually have on the environment, and those effects are very obvious. You know, we've taken a little bit of pause. There's a reduction in pollution, and we see the world changes around us. So the momentum, I believe for climate change after this will be a positive one. Just by the nature of what we're observing. There will be two negative levers to this. the first lever that will be negative is the fact that we need to have an economic recovery. And at this moment in time, that economic recovery needs to be fast. So we need to start moving and we need to start moving even faster. In some ways, that will generate probably the impetus for certain governments and certain corporations to more aggressive about manufacturing, logistics and things that we know are implicitly creating pollution. And then the second piece that is negative to this climate change agenda, and us obviously adopting more renewable energies, better technologies, and everything that would make this world that we're currently in, in lockdown, more sustainable into the future is the fact that obviously the price of oil has come down plummeting to levels never seen before. And so it's actually very, very cheap.  So those are the two forces that I believe we're having infighting on. There's many other forces we could have around this,
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